A bunch of questions

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Anyar
Posts: 14
Joined: 10 Feb 2017 23:17

A bunch of questions

Postby Anyar » 10 Feb 2017 23:24

Hi, beginner here, just started trying yesterday (no success yet, as expected).

I read a bunch of articles and I saw one where the author dreamt of drowning.
I'm pretty scared of that, so if I find myself, say, stuck in a submarine with water pouring in, how do I escape? Or if I can't escape, how do I wake up?

Also, about portal doors and mirrors, are they basically normal doors that you imagine have an entirely new 'scene' behind them? Do you have to create them yourself, or do you have to hope that wherever you are has doors/mirrors nearby?

Is it possible to feel pain?

Lastly, how do you inevitably wake up? Is it like, you're frolicking on a beach, then you suddenly wake up in the real world? Or do you somehow 'fade' away slowly? Or do you just 'fade' away and continue sleeping?

Thanks!

Eve0
Posts: 7
Joined: 21 Apr 2016 15:57

Re: A bunch of questions

Postby Eve0 » 11 Feb 2017 02:07

I used to be scared of something like what you're describing too, when I first started lucid dreaming, but lucid nightmares are very rare, and if unpleasant situations do arise, it is fairly easy to wake up if that's the rout you choose to take. It's hard to explain how, but I basically just open my eyes or tell myself to "wake up" repeatedly until I do, which is what I would do when I started lucid dreaming. However nightmares and lucid nightmares shouldn't be viewed as a negative thing, as all shadow figures, or aspects of your nightmares, are said to be a part of your psyche. If you do find yourself in these situations it would be wiser to confront the shadow figure or whatever it may be, (although this would be harder to do if you're stuck in a submarine) and figure out what part of your psyche that figure represents. Charlie Morley has some great videos on YouTube about nightmares, and how to use them. I'd recommend watching his Ted Talk on nightmares (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1i6A7t6L2g) and then you can visit his channel to see other videos on the topic. If you are in this situation and want to escape though, (although I can't stress how unlikely it is that you'll find yourself in this situation), escaping should be as easy as going through a wall, or opening a door, or just changing the dream scene altogether by spinning around and mentally willing the dream to change. Remember, if you have a high enough level of lucidity (and in a nightmare like this I imagine that you would) you can control everything and do whatever you want, including steering the ship up into the sky and then draining it if that's how you choose to deal with that. Anything's possible. And if for whatever reason you can't escape/wake up, just remember you're in absolutely no physical danger and your real body is lying in bed somewhere peacefully, although I know that's harder to tell yourself when you're drowning in a hyper-realistic dream.

As for the portal doors, if there aren't any doors around, really anything could work as one as long as you expect that you'll be in a new dream scene when you enter through it. For example, if you're in the woods, you could see two trees that are close together and walk through those and that could be your portal door. That's not the only way of changing the scene, though, you could simply alter it with your hand (wiping the dream scene in front of you as if your hand is an eraser) or turning around and expecting to see a new scene when you do so.

It is possible to feel pain, but again, is very unlikely, and again, you're in no physical danger so this shouldn't be a problem, and you can always wake yourself up, talk to the nightmarish aspect that is causing you pain, or just escaping the situation by flying away or whatever. But if you're worried about jumping off a building and landing, or something like that, you won't feel pain, maybe just the pressure of the impact.

For me, personally, I can feel myself waking up, it's hard to explain, but the dream sort of fades and you can feel yourself slowly waking up and you try to stabilize your dream, and sometimes it doesn't work, sometimes it does, which I think depends on whether you're waking up because the dream isn't stabilized, or because it's just the natural time your body would wake up. However, you can also wake up very suddenly too, if something startles you, for example, and your lucidity is low, it can jolt you and wake you up immediately. You do fade away from dreams into sleep, which I know because REM cycles end and you can remember dreams you had earlier in the night dreams you had closer to waking up without waking up after the dream you had earlier in the night, because there's likely a gap between the dream you had earlier in the night and the one you had closer towards waking up. I think it'd be very very unlikely to fade from a lucid dream into sleep though, but I know you can lose your lucidity in a dream completely and have the dream continue (your memory is impaired in lucid dreams so if you don't remind yourself you're dreaming frequently you can lose lucidity altogether) so I guess you can go from a lucid dream into a regular dream into sleep. But I think mainly you just exit a lucid dream from waking up, not going straight from a lucid dream into dreamless sleep.

Hope this helped! Good luck with lucid dreaming in the future!

Anyar
Posts: 14
Joined: 10 Feb 2017 23:17

Re: A bunch of questions

Postby Anyar » 11 Feb 2017 02:55

Eve0 wrote:I used to be scared of something like what you're describing too, when I first started lucid dreaming, but lucid nightmares are very rare, and if unpleasant situations do arise, it is fairly easy to wake up if that's the rout you choose to take. It's hard to explain how, but I basically just open my eyes or tell myself to "wake up" repeatedly until I do, which is what I would do when I started lucid dreaming. However nightmares and lucid nightmares shouldn't be viewed as a negative thing, as all shadow figures, or aspects of your nightmares, are said to be a part of your psyche. If you do find yourself in these situations it would be wiser to confront the shadow figure or whatever it may be, (although this would be harder to do if you're stuck in a submarine) and figure out what part of your psyche that figure represents. Charlie Morley has some great videos on YouTube about nightmares, and how to use them. I'd recommend watching his Ted Talk on nightmares (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1i6A7t6L2g) and then you can visit his channel to see other videos on the topic. If you are in this situation and want to escape though, (although I can't stress how unlikely it is that you'll find yourself in this situation), escaping should be as easy as going through a wall, or opening a door, or just changing the dream scene altogether by spinning around and mentally willing the dream to change. Remember, if you have a high enough level of lucidity (and in a nightmare like this I imagine that you would) you can control everything and do whatever you want, including steering the ship up into the sky and then draining it if that's how you choose to deal with that. Anything's possible. And if for whatever reason you can't escape/wake up, just remember you're in absolutely no physical danger and your real body is lying in bed somewhere peacefully, although I know that's harder to tell yourself when you're drowning in a hyper-realistic dream.

As for the portal doors, if there aren't any doors around, really anything could work as one as long as you expect that you'll be in a new dream scene when you enter through it. For example, if you're in the woods, you could see two trees that are close together and walk through those and that could be your portal door. That's not the only way of changing the scene, though, you could simply alter it with your hand (wiping the dream scene in front of you as if your hand is an eraser) or turning around and expecting to see a new scene when you do so.

It is possible to feel pain, but again, is very unlikely, and again, you're in no physical danger so this shouldn't be a problem, and you can always wake yourself up, talk to the nightmarish aspect that is causing you pain, or just escaping the situation by flying away or whatever. But if you're worried about jumping off a building and landing, or something like that, you won't feel pain, maybe just the pressure of the impact.

For me, personally, I can feel myself waking up, it's hard to explain, but the dream sort of fades and you can feel yourself slowly waking up and you try to stabilize your dream, and sometimes it doesn't work, sometimes it does, which I think depends on whether you're waking up because the dream isn't stabilized, or because it's just the natural time your body would wake up. However, you can also wake up very suddenly too, if something startles you, for example, and your lucidity is low, it can jolt you and wake you up immediately. You do fade away from dreams into sleep, which I know because REM cycles end and you can remember dreams you had earlier in the night dreams you had closer to waking up without waking up after the dream you had earlier in the night, because there's likely a gap between the dream you had earlier in the night and the one you had closer towards waking up. I think it'd be very very unlikely to fade from a lucid dream into sleep though, but I know you can lose your lucidity in a dream completely and have the dream continue (your memory is impaired in lucid dreams so if you don't remind yourself you're dreaming frequently you can lose lucidity altogether) so I guess you can go from a lucid dream into a regular dream into sleep. But I think mainly you just exit a lucid dream from waking up, not going straight from a lucid dream into dreamless sleep.

Hope this helped! Good luck with lucid dreaming in the future!

First of all, thank you so much for the detailed reply.

Glad to hear that such experiences aren't common. I'm checking out that TED video.

Pretty convenient that pretty much any space can function as a portal.

I guess waking up directly is very nice, since that way it's (probably) easier to remember the dream you just had rather than forget the experience.

Again, thanks for the help! :)

nickbor
Posts: 15
Joined: 16 Jul 2016 02:28

Re: A bunch of questions

Postby nickbor » 12 Feb 2017 06:41

I don't know how to answer the specifics about someone elses nightmare of drowning and such but my favorite lucid dream I had first started out as a horrible nighmare where I was a soldier and I was experiencing a situation where it was like the invasion of Normandy on earth and I was a turret gunner, it was totally impossible because I was fighting a sea of endless hordes of beings from some other planet, but once I realized I was in an impossible situation and it was not real and it was just a dream I was immediately transported to what I would say was a very pleasant atmosphere in a field with tall grasses nice trees to my right nice sunny day with a light breeze. it was like being in a big garden of Eden. I was walking slowly forward with two friends and my astral body was trying to get into my dream body. what was so cool was that all of the animated life and atmosphere in the dream seemed like a gigantic work of art. I dreamt up a work of art which I was immersed into in 3d. It was so cool. but this I could only get to by knowing the nightmare was not real beacause it was just an unrealistic situation.

peace and love

Anyar
Posts: 14
Joined: 10 Feb 2017 23:17

Re: A bunch of questions

Postby Anyar » 12 Feb 2017 15:17

nickbor wrote:I don't know how to answer the specifics about someone else's nightmare of drowning and such but my favorite lucid dream I had first started out as a horrible nightmare where I was a soldier and I was experiencing a situation where it was like the invasion of Normandy on earth and I was a turret gunner, it was totally impossible because I was fighting a sea of endless hordes of beings from some other planet, but once I realized I was in an impossible situation and it was not real and it was just a dream I was immediately transported to what I would say was a very pleasant atmosphere in a field with tall grasses nice trees to my right nice sunny day with a light breeze. it was like being in a big garden of Eden. I was walking slowly forward with two friends and my astral body was trying to get into my dream body. what was so cool was that all of the animated life and atmosphere in the dream seemed like a gigantic work of art. I dreamt up a work of art which I was immersed into in 3d. It was so cool, but this I could only get to by knowing the nightmare was not real because it was just an unrealistic situation.

Peace and love.


Nice. I'll try that if I ever get into a nightmare.

Thanks.

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Rhapsode
Posts: 7
Joined: 04 Feb 2017 23:29
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Re: A bunch of questions

Postby Rhapsode » 13 Feb 2017 02:38

During the sleep paralysis which occurs while we're dreaming we are able to control two physical functions: eye movements and breathing. Because we can still breath, it is unlikely that you will experience a 'drowning' sensation.

Yes, you can feel pain in a dream. Any waking sensation can be replicated in the dream state. I had my wisdom teeth extracted and then a few weeks later relieved the entire experience in a vivid and very painful dream. I always warn potential lucid dreamers about this because they should know that the more vivid their dreams become, the more they're going to experience sensations, both pleasant and unpleasant.
Read about my dreams at http://dreamingstrangely.blogspot.com/

Anyar
Posts: 14
Joined: 10 Feb 2017 23:17

Re: A bunch of questions

Postby Anyar » 03 Mar 2017 04:56

Rhapsode wrote:During the sleep paralysis which occurs while we're dreaming we are able to control two physical functions: eye movements and breathing. Because we can still breath, it is unlikely that you will experience a 'drowning' sensation.

Yes, you can feel pain in a dream. Any waking sensation can be replicated in the dream state. I had my wisdom teeth extracted and then a few weeks later relieved the entire experience in a vivid and very painful dream. I always warn potential lucid dreamers about this because they should know that the more vivid their dreams become, the more they're going to experience sensations, both pleasant and unpleasant.

My inspiration for asking the question on drowning was because of an article on this website where the author drowned in a dream. She even said she switched to third-person and watched her body bloat up and die right after she 'died' in first person.


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