"Yo" from America, an introduction of me, TheCaptain5

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TheCaptain5
Posts: 7
Joined: 14 Sep 2012 07:29

"Yo" from America, an introduction of me, TheCaptain5

Postby TheCaptain5 » 15 Sep 2012 07:33

I've already posted two topics hear in the forum and I haven't even introduced myself yet. How rude am I? :)

Anyway, I'm from Utah, the United States of America. I'm 15 (sixteen in less than two months) and are an unpublished writer working hard to get my first few books out and about. I've been learning about lucid dreaming for the past two weeks, and have been performing several of the techniques described on this website. (No lucid dreams yet, but I've been keeping a dream journal which has drastically increased my dream recall.)

Lucid dreaming has always interested me, reminding me of the holodecks you see in the Star Trek series. It has always been a fascination and a skill I'd use for both pleasure and self improvement.

As some adults on this forum may know, the teenaged years are the most difficult and stressful period in life. It's the stage where you slowly emerge from childhood into adulthood and can be quite stressful and even depressing. Lucid dreaming can help with that stress and anxiety, and that's the primary reason I want to learn the skill so I can SURVIVE!

I suffer from a condition known as high-functioning autism, which puts a greater deal of stress and anxiety on me than a normal teenager. It also hinders my ability to socialize, and I find myself descending deeper and deeper into isolation. I fear walking out my own front door, I can't start a conversation with a stranger and barely keep it alive, and that behavior is simply unacceptable. There is no cure for autism, although I hope lucid dreaming will help to demand my brain to oppress the mental disorder and promote less anxiety and more social interaction.

So basically, I consider lucid dreaming a lifeline. I can't see myself progressing into adulthood with a disorder so horrible my parents have to speak for me. I must become independent, or face a life filled with dependency, anxiety, and complete and utter social isolation.

Seems like the kind of drama you'd expect from someone my age, yes? Well, life's dramatic, every part of it. No barrier shall block me, for I am an American. And Americans never quit, never surrender and never let go of their strong sense of independence and freedom.

NAIAD
Posts: 19
Joined: 26 Aug 2012 19:46

Re: "Yo" from America, an introduction of me, TheCaptain5

Postby NAIAD » 15 Sep 2012 09:07

TheCaptain5 wrote:I've already posted two topics hear in the forum and I haven't even introduced myself yet. How rude am I? :)

Anyway, I'm from Utah, the United States of America. I'm 15 (sixteen in less than two months) and are an unpublished writer working hard to get my first few books out and about. I've been learning about lucid dreaming for the past two weeks, and have been performing several of the techniques described on this website. (No lucid dreams yet, but I've been keeping a dream journal which has drastically increased my dream recall.)

Lucid dreaming has always interested me, reminding me of the holodecks you see in the Star Trek series. It has always been a fascination and a skill I'd use for both pleasure and self improvement.

As some adults on this forum may know, the teenaged years are the most difficult and stressful period in life. It's the stage where you slowly emerge from childhood into adulthood and can be quite stressful and even depressing. Lucid dreaming can help with that stress and anxiety, and that's the primary reason I want to learn the skill so I can SURVIVE!

I suffer from a condition known as high-functioning autism, which puts a greater deal of stress and anxiety on me than a normal teenager. It also hinders my ability to socialize, and I find myself descending deeper and deeper into isolation. I fear walking out my own front door, I can't start a conversation with a stranger and barely keep it alive, and that behavior is simply unacceptable. There is no cure for autism, although I hope lucid dreaming will help to demand my brain to oppress the mental disorder and promote less anxiety and more social interaction.

So basically, I consider lucid dreaming a lifeline. I can't see myself progressing into adulthood with a disorder so horrible my parents have to speak for me. I must become independent, or face a life filled with dependency, anxiety, and complete and utter social isolation.

Seems like the kind of drama you'd expect from someone my age, yes? Well, life's dramatic, every part of it. No barrier shall block me, for I am an American. And Americans never quit, never surrender and never let go of their strong sense of independence and freedom.


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