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New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 10:03
by Netta
Hi! first of all, thanks for an amazing website about lucid dreaming, I owe it my very first lucid dream which i had last night:DAmazing!(I`ll tell you more about it under "share your lucid dreams")Anyway I just wanted to introduce myself and ask a question I was wondering about. Im a 19 year old girl from Norway who first heared about lucid dreaming a week ago or so, and found it really interesting, and of course got an intense wish to do it myself. I've been reading a lot about it, lookt at some movies, done reality checks, kept a journal and all the newbie stuff, and it payed off, last night! But i have a question for you: Is it possible to "exhaust" you brain while beeing lucid at night(or trying to be), so that during the day you'll be tired and/or don't fuction as well as you normally would? (I woke up several times during the night)

Again, thanks for teaching me about lucid dreaming!

Netta

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 11:25
by Jack Reacher
Hey there, welcome to the site! Sometimes when doing the Wack Back to Bed technique (WBTB) I will get up early, around 5:00 am to lucid dream, which can leave me exausted if I dont fall asleep. Also this is sort of unrelated but if I study maths late into the night (maths major here) I will have incredibly exhausting mental dreams where everything is set out mathematically and I will have little energy the next day.

However as for lucid dreaming, it seems like if you are aware you aren't giving your mind rest, but its pretty much the same as normal dreaming in terms of rest, you should be fine. I have had like an hour long lucid dream that got exhausting during the dream, but when I woke up I was fine.

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 11:44
by Netta
Thank you for the answer, Jack! It's very helpfull:) The reason I was worried about it is because I'm a med. stuent (2. semester) and I often have long intensive days of reading at the university, and I of course dont want to have less energy during the day because of my dreams. I guess i did the WBTB without really trying to do that particular technique, and after i woke up the time was 2:00 am. Thats pretty early for a lucid dream if I've done my reseach correctly. But it worked and I'm really excited about it!
So, thanks again for the reply!

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 20:17
by Jack Reacher
Yeah I know what you mean im also studying at uni, personally I save all my lucid dreaming for the weekend or days where I have a late start, its also less frustrating this way as you dont have to worry about reality checks 24/7.

My personal strat is to get up at 5 am in Sunday and try the WBTB, whether it works or not I set my alarm for 7 am for the monday start. Because im used to getting up at 5 am, I become a lot more aware and sometimes I slightly wake up out of a dream around 6 am even though there is no alarm. Because the alarm doesnt fully wake me up as long as I keep my eyes closed when I wake up and dont move at all its extremely likely I will slip into a lucid dream within the next few seconds.

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 09 Dec 2012 19:52
by David
Hi.

This is my first post on the websight, and my first post of any kind in a long time.

I have some questions about lucid dreaming, that I couldn't find on you main website.

I've read and heard about people loosing they're grip on reality. Is it because of a physical disablity or can someone accidentally spark disabilities such as mutipal personalitys, vivid halusinations (involving any individgual or combination of sences), loss of memory, falce memorys, or a modification of personal identy/personality.

If these things are possible what expermenting might trigger them and how likely are they to occure.

Also is their anything I should look for in my family line. My famly has a history of madness :(


P.S.
Throuly facinated with the subject of lucid dreaming.

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 09 Dec 2012 20:40
by lucidinthe sky
Netta wrote: But i have a question for you: Is it possible to "exhaust" you brain while beeing lucid at night(or trying to be), so that during the day you'll be tired and/or don't fuction as well as you normally would? (I woke up several times during the night)


Yes it's possible to exhaust yourself and not get good sleep or enough, but it's not directly a result of lucid dreaming. It's an indirect effect that comes from keeping yourself either completely or partially awake when you are trying to lucid dream, especially WILD. Ideally, you stay aware, not awake, but it's pretty typical for a lot of people.

When I first started doing WILD, I would start right when I went to bed and would spend entire nights in a state of light sleep, feeling like I had hardly slept at all. The best way I've found to avoid this is to leave the first 5-6 hours of sleep alone and don't even attempt to lucid dream then (you are unlikely to succeed anyway). Then even if you end up keeping yourself awake or in light sleep, you will have at least had 5-6 hours of good sleep.

Re: New to lucid dreaming + question

Posted: 12 Dec 2012 03:04
by David
I've read and heard about people loosing they're grip on reality. Is it because of a physical disability or can someone accidentally spark disabilities such as multipal personalitys, vivid hallucinations (involving any individual or combination of sences), loss of memory, false memorys, or a modification of personal identity/personality.

If these things are possible what experimenting might trigger them and how likely are they to occur.

Also is their anything I should look for in my family line. My famly has a history of madness :(

(I'm still looking for the answer to my question) (I've read about hypnosis producing these results but it's all anecdotal evidence that doesn't look good so far and I found a trusted enough source.)

I'm being psyched out! :shock: