Writing an essay about lucid dreaming..HELP

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Favorite thing/things about lucid dreaming

eliminates your fears
5
14%
experience things you otherwise would not be able to (i.e. flying)
9
25%
carry out sexual fantasies
5
14%
it is just fun
5
14%
to escape
4
11%
reunite with lost loved ones
2
6%
work on real-life skills
3
8%
other
3
8%
 
Total votes: 36

katelyncampos
Posts: 1
Joined: 28 Nov 2017 02:07

Writing an essay about lucid dreaming..HELP

Postby katelyncampos » 28 Nov 2017 02:20

Hi guys, I am writing a type of research essay about lucid dreaming, and I would love to hear some personal stories regarding it. Specifically answering these questions-- Was it easy for you to start? What is the craziest experience you have had lucid dreaming? Have you experienced any of the so-called benefits that come with lucid dreaming? Personally, what is your favorite thing about lucid dreaming?...Any answers you can give me will help me immensely!! Thank you so much! Happy dreaming, Katelyn

User avatar
Summerlander
Posts: 4245
Joined: 22 Sep 2011 19:52

Re: Writing an essay about lucid dreaming..HELP

Postby Summerlander » 28 Nov 2017 22:20

I've always had the tendency to lucid dream and had many false awakenings/out-of-body experiences as a kid. But serious practice began about a decade ago and it was productive from the offset---I tend to pay attention to the contents of my mind anyway. There have been many crazy (going by my definition here) sleep experiences, so I will select my most recent which consists of lucid-dream chaining:

http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=18606&p=63298#p63298

There have been noticeable benefits to lucid dreaming in my case, and they fall in the categories mentioned here---my favourite is artistic inspiration:

http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/the-phase-state.html

I must say that flight and sex are intensely enjoyable activities in lucid dreams, but nothing like those quasi-epiphanic transcendental experiences---especially when a phenomenal stillness akin to meditative states is experienced.
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

AmaraDreamer
Posts: 27
Joined: 21 Nov 2017 06:41

Re: Writing an essay about lucid dreaming..HELP

Postby AmaraDreamer » 03 Dec 2017 10:47

"So called" benefits? Any conscious experience has consequences. Don't think that dreams are the exception. Experiences people have shape them from childhood, and much more important than genetics. Anything can be improved. Just need to get the conscious in the right state. There are no limits. Literally. Period.

User avatar
Markis
Posts: 7
Joined: 25 Jan 2018 05:29

Re: Writing an essay about lucid dreaming..HELP

Postby Markis » 29 Jan 2018 16:00

To what "so-called benefits" are you referring?

It began for me at age 5 with false awakenings, a common experience that persisted into my late teens.
I would estimate half of my dreams were lucid to a strong degree during my childhood and formative years.
A bizarre occurrence happened at age 9 when I shared a dream with my best friend, a neighbor girl who lived across the street.
Imagine my shock the next day when she told me "I had a dream with you in it." and then proceeded to share the details of MY dream.
It wasn't until my early 20's that I discovered the term Lucid Dreaming to encapsulate what was to me a normal experience... I just assumed everyone dreamed as I did, and was shocked to find out that I was an odd minority.

But I can tell you this.. a funny anecdote..
My experience over the last 20 years talking with people who dabble in dream-work, specifically men who at some point during adulthood learn of lucid dreaming and the accompanying possibilities, want to become lucid for One Reason... so they can conjure up a sex partner.
Such is the male psyche.. lol
I'm not saying this is a bad thing. It's not.
Consider the relief it would give someone like Stephen Hawking, whose entire waking existence is in a body INCAPABLE of meaningful movement.

For me, the best thing about lucid dreaming is that it allows me to experience people, places, and what-if scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible.
Foremost, it's an experience that demonstrates the fact that we are not just a physical body.
It is the best tool we have available to discover the spiritual nature of the self, our shared cosmology, the mechanics of reality, and the conscious-connectedness of all things.


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