Questions for Rebecca

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 02:07

Chackøwsky wrote:Hi Rebecca,
I am new to Lucid Dreaming, I have only been working on dream recall for about two weeks. Things are going slower than I thought, I only have 9 dreams recorded out of 14 days. I was wondering if this was actually a good start or if I should do anything to boost dream recall with supplements. Also, how many dreams should you have recorded before you should start any techniques for Lucid Dreaming?

Thanks


There is no magic number of dreams to record before you can start LDing. Once you feel you're having vivid dreams several times per week, that would be a solid starting point. But I'm not going to dictate what's right for you. Keep a dream journal going all through your LD practice, and it will keep improving.

On improving dream recall, I answered this question just a moment ago so I'll point you to my answer later in this thread: http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=500&start=90#p6212

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 02:12

TheLotusEater wrote:Hey, my name is Logan :) I'm 13 and I tried Lucid Dreaming. It went from watching the patterns in my eyelids to Dream Paralysis. I felt weight gain on my body parts but then I heard like demonic whispering but I wasn't dreaming yet, I think. Btw, this happened to me like 5 minutes ago :roll: Can I do anything to prevent that? :?:


The demonic whispering was not real, I can promise you that much. You would have been half-dreaming / hallucinating while holding some awareness of the real world (the natural paralysis of your sleeping body). Scary - but not harmful and actually you are very close to lucid dreaming.

This explanation of sleep paralysis should help you understand exactly what's going on:
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/sleep-paralysis.html

Meanwhile if you are prone to frequent sleep paralysis, I would strongly recommend Ryan Hurd's book on the subject which explains in detail how to convert SP into lucid dreams:
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/sleep-paralysis-nightmares.html

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 02:20

Beck_14 wrote:Hi :)

I discovered this website only yesterday and became really intrigued about lucid dreaming! I read about it all day, and decided to try some of your techniques.
However I read multiple things online about people saying that sleep paralysis is terrifying.
Then when I went to bed last night I got too scared to try anything because I was so afraid of sleep paralysis :/

In fact I was too scared to sleep altogether which seems irrational to me now that it's the morning...
But I wanted to ask you if this would actually happen if I wasn't even trying to lucid dream in the first place?

Please help! :|



I will let you in on a secret. In 14 years of lucid dreaming, I have experienced less than a handful of unexpected/unwanted episodes of sleep paralysis. None of them were very scary - each time I knew exactly what was going on and was able to rationalize and snap out of it. Actually they made for quite cool stories to tell my friends afterwards. ;)

Even when I induce sleep paralysis intentionally for OBEs/WILDs I quickly push my mind into the dreamworld so I have little or no awareness of any paralysis and NO experience of negative entities whatsoever.

Some people are prone to experiencing sleep paralysis against their will. If you were one of these people, you'd probably know about it by now. It can of course happen without doing lucid dream practice.

However it is also true that by consciously exploring these borderland sleep states, you are more likely to stumble onto weird phenomena -- but still not guaranteed by a long shot.

If you're afraid of a particular experience, educate yourself before trying to induce a lucid dream. Fear comes from the unknown. Shine a light on your fears, you will be well equipped to deal with anything that comes your way. Seriously, your fear is ALL in your mind, and you can get past it.

Finally, remember that every weird sound, sensation, vision, or emotion you experience during these phase states comes from your own mind. There are no demons, witches, ghosts, or ghouls trying to harm you. It is simply a wonderful illusion created by the human mind. And this is just one gateway to the world of lucid dreams.

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 02:26

Christopaz wrote:Oh Hi there!


What is the difference between Isochronic and Binaural beats?
Since I checked out the net and found Isochronic is. well, expensive.


Binaural Beats are the original brainwave entrainment technology. They require headphones/earphones to work, since two separate frequencies are played into each ear. The brain reacts by creating a third tone, which sets the frequency following response.

Isochronic Tones are the modern form, and require no headphones as the entrainment effect plays a single tone which can be heard the same in both ears.

Both technologies work well for me. Both are supported by scientific studies and are proven in inducing states of meditation. I recommend them because decent daily meditation is a major boost for lucid dreaming.

I explain more about how entrainment works and what's the best one to use here:
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/lucid-dreaming-mp3.html

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 02:31

Sir_Serix wrote:Hi Rebecca,
last night I had a lucid dream,and I have realized once I woke up that even if I'm lucid I can't remember some things.
Eg.: When I had that dream,the first thing I did was flying,but I completely forgot my new lucid dream objective (It's about portals,but it's not important),neither I remembered that maths keep my mind "awake",I only rubbed my hands.
So,my question is: is it normal? is there any way to "solve it",or at least remember things?
Sorry if I've got errors,english is not my native language


Yes it's normal - and yes you can improve it! Work more on your lucid dream incubation. Keep focusing on the four things you MUST always do on becoming lucid, eg:

1. Say "This is a dream."
2. Rub your hands together.
3. Say "Clarity now!"
4. Recall your intention - ie find a portal.

Memory is a tricky thing in the dreamworld and you will have lucid dreams where you simply forget to do this stuff and forget your intention. But like I say, with proper incubation / setting the intention, you can ingrain these thought patterns as a habit the moment you achieve lucidity:
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/setting-a-lucid-dream-intention.html

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 04:14

Ikamon357 wrote:
Doctorjuice wrote:Ugh, sorry to pester you with so many questions.

My lucid dreams have started to become frequent, I had three over the course of three days and two in one night. They have only lasted less than 10 seconds each I would say. The latter two of my lucid dreams ended in fear, the first I couldn't remember why, but the second I remember quite vividly. I looked away from a woman and then back at her, now having three eyes and in the process of eating my arm. Needless to say, this caused a very intense fear in me and I woke up within seconds. In one of my previous lucid dreams I also met a disturbing figure. In a sense, I fear my own fear, or fear thinking negative thoughts because I believe they will manifest themselves when I am lucid dreaming (and they do!). This is partly because I've read some horrifying stories of lucid dreaming gone bad.

So, in a sense, I am fearful of lucid dreaming even though I very much want to realize the awesome possibilities that they offer. That is one explanation for why these disturbing figures are showing up in my lucid dreams (note they don't show up in my regular dreams, only my lucid ones).

Another explanation is this is a result of some insecurity or fear I have (I have one in mind, but I'd rather not share it). Both are equally plausible in my mind.

So, I am kind of gunshy of lucid dreaming now, I've stopped doing techniques and writing down my dreams because I don't want to screw my mind up or experience such intense fear again. At the same time, I really want to realize the awesome possibilities lucid dreaming has to offer.

Any advice?

I think that you should continue lucid dreaming and perhaps try a session of self hypnosis rebecca mentioned on her website only with the outcome keeping you from fearing lucid dreams. Hyhpnosis is not a science fiction. Your minds absolute basis for this is about its fear. If anything is going to mess with your mind, it would be your phobias. I also recommend trying to eliminate this fear inside a lucid dream or during a WILD attempt when your subconscious is exposed through your conscious access so, like in the movie inception, the idea can naturally grow and form itself in your subconscious so your brain will stop having these scary dreams. I hope this answer helps you.


If your regular dreams are primarily fueled by subconscious thought and expectation... then your lucid dreams are fueled by primarily conscious thought and expectation. This is something you have control over. Right now, you are letting your fears take control in your dreams when ultimately you have the power to fix this.

As Ikamon suggested, hypnosis can help plant that seed that lucid dreams can be full of joy and positive insight. I would also recommend addressing any specific phobias or anxieties you have in waking life, either through counseling or cognitive behavioral therapy (very effective for phobias). Meditate on the idea of having positive lucid dreams and let go of your negative expectations.

I think time will help - the memory of these negative lucid dreams will fade, you'll forget about the lucid nightmares you heard from others (stop reading about this, it can be a self-fulfilling prophecy as I think you have learned), and learn to heighten your lucidity so next time you have more conscious focus and any nightmare threads will have less opportunity to take over. When fully lucid, you should be able refocus and take charge of these situations, instead of passively letting the nightmare happen to you.

Finally, take lucid dreaming at your own pace. If you want to take a break for a few months, do. You'll know when the time is right to get back on the horse...

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 04:36

TheBarracuda57 wrote:Hi there Rebecca. I'm Barry and new to this site.

I am 18 and have been able to lucid dream since the age of 5. At the age of 12 I could lucid dream so regularly I had one every three nights. I got worried that because of this, I couldn't have normal dreams (when my subconscious helps me with mental stresses in real life), I forced myself to forget my dreams in the morning to stop having lucid dreams (the dreams which had no message compared to the unconscious ones). I eventually lost my ability all together, forcefully. Age 14 I found out what I could do was "lucid dreaming". I have been visiting your site for 4 years. I have tried so many things but to no avail. I get maybe 2 lucid dreams a year, maybe 3.

I have 3 questions I really need answering. I would be infinitely grateful if you could help.

1) Because I used to be able to do it loads before, is it possible for me to unconsciously remember what I did to have those dreams? When I try consciously (through the day) to remember what I did when I was younger, it seems that the harder I focus on Lucid dreaming.. the less dreaming I actually have. Do you think something like reverse psychology ("I won't have a lucid dream tonight/I won't be able to remember how I lucid dreamt when I was younger"), would find the solution deep within? I can't explain this any better. The main question is: how can I remember what I used to do in order to be lucid? I'm sure my old technique is deep in my subconscious, but I don't know how to get to it..


Take it easy - I think you're overcomplicating things. Your goal is to learn lucid dreaming again, and there are many ways to do this described in the Lucid Dreaming Techniques section linked below. You don't need to uncover lost childhood memories to figure out how you used to do it. If you can't remember how it came naturally as a child, then you'll just have to start over again. At least you already know you can do it. Most people go into it with serious self doubt, so you have a major head start.
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/lucid-dreaming-techniques.html

Note: reverse psychology can work in as much as trying to repress an idea can make it poke through in your subconscious. Sensitive or fearful people can find horror movies make them dream of poltergeists even when they tried to suppress the very thought. The imagery has to be quite powerful. So spend 5 minutes before bed trying NOT to think about lucid dreaming. It may work for you. If it doesn't work after a week or two, just move on. But hey, it may work the first night. :P

TheBarracuda57 wrote:2) What do "you" personally do before you sleep? Eg. write what you want to do in your dream, meditate, eat and think about when you close your eyes and drift to sleep. I'm just curious to know..


It varies. At the moment I use a combination of night-time meditation/ WILD/ dream re-entry (esp. from 6am onwards). I also incubate lucid dreams by writing and thinking about my dream intentions during the day. I practice reality checks and try to be self aware while awake. When I write my dreams down in the morning, I also have way more DILDs. Sometimes I forget or can't be bothered, which is really counterproductive because I know how powerful dream journaling is.

TheBarracuda57 wrote:3) Finally. I had a recent dream where I was in a field. My friends were in the middle at this huge table. Surrounding us were dragons and trees. I was so focused on what my friends were saying, I wasn't any paying attention to myself or the obvious dream dragons. I always seem to be focused on my friends in dreams. I think because of this I never look around to see if there is anything abnormal about where I am. I mean.. a table in a field.. and dragons? Yet I still passed these off in the dream as real. What can I do during the day to improve focus on the dream world? Do I need to focus more on what I'm doing and what is around me.. rather than focusing on my friends or crowds? Can you help?

Thank you for your time, Barry


I don't think it matters what you focus on, as long as you are mindful and can ascertain the difference in this particular feature when you're dreaming vs when you're awake.

For instance, I might dream of an old school friend in the wrong context - such as in the workplace 10 years later. This should trigger a reality check. Or I could look out for deceased people in dreams, alive and well. Lucidity doesn't have to be triggered by dragons or flying pigs or anything wild and outrageous. It's the subtle inaccuracies that can often trigger moments of spontaneous lucidity.

You can also meditate and increase your self awareness while awake. Always be mindful of where you are. Continually remind yourself what you are doing, ask yourself if it's real or not, do reality checks, and make sure you're not dreaming. Many people don't truly "get" this, but it's one of the more powerful ways to create spontaneous lucidity in dreams. I should do an in-depth article on this - look out for it on the site sometime soon. In the meantime, this is the closest thing that explains it:
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/reality-checks.html

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 04:48

Gerrard8 wrote:Hey Rebecca, I'm new here to this site, I'm trying some methods and they don't work but I have just started and I'm not too worried, I can see the progress. I just want to ask some questions...
today I tried self hypnosis (or meditation cause I forgot the difference lol) and few minutes after relaxing and stuff, out of nothing I just heard a loud noise that sounds like electricity wave and I moved my hands instantly and fast closer to my body, it felt like a shock! Some weird stuff...


If you're seeing progress, then they DO work.... let's not condition negative beliefs from the start :D

The loud noise you heard was a hypnagogic effect that often marks the onset of a WILD / OBE. Very exciting! The first time I heard this I was so shocked, it snapped me right out of it. The second time, I thought my head was going to explode and I was going to have a stroke. Needless to say... I didn't. So it's just an internal noise, a transition state, which signifies the Mind Awake / Body Asleep state. Robert Monroe describes it in detail in his exceptional book: http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/lucid-dreaming-books.html#journeys


Gerrard8 wrote:Another thing I wanna know, is if it's normal to forget counting and visualizing yourself going downstairs for several times? I pictured myself coming down from stairs and after a 4th/5th step I just found myself having some thoughts, and 5 seconds after that realizing that I've forgot to finish the steps...


Yes, you're losing focus. Practice will help.

When you realize you've lost your thread, immediately pick it up where you left off. This is good training and you will get better.


Gerrard8 wrote:Also I want to know why are there so many different tutorials to lucid dreaming, every one of them is a bit different. Like I said I'm knew here so I'm confused a little.


There are many routes to lucid dreaming. They all fall into two categories:

- DILDs (spontaneous recognition of the dream state through enhanced self awareness)
- WILDs (deliberate induction of a dream state through controlled thought processes)

Work on a few techniques at a time; don't overload yourself. Find what works best for YOU based on your existing abilities and keep practicing those. There is no need to learn every single technique out there, usually the most popular techniques work for most people. These are the ones I describe on the website and in my digital course.

Gerrard8 wrote:btw. thanks for making all this stuff for us ;)


My pleasure.

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Rebecca » 03 Apr 2012 04:53

trouble8 wrote:Hey,
When I lucid dream I feel like I'm still dreaming. I am aware that I am dreaming and can now act on this and control my dreams but my brain is fuzy and I don't feel the urge to change anything in my dreams except I always fly. I always remember these dreams when I barley ever remember normal dreams so what I want to ask are these really lucid dreams or are they just normal dreams with a heightened consciousness:?:


These sound like lucid dreams to me. Especially the flying part, this seems a fundamental human desire.

"Normal dreams with a heightened consciousness" is a pretty good definition of lucid dreaming.

I'd suggest becoming fully lucid and then putting your lucidity to good use:

- Heightening your lucidity
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/how-to-stay-lucid.html

- Setting a lucid dream intention
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/setting-a-lucid-dream-intention.html

- Passive lucid dreaming
http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/how-do-i-lucid-dream-without-consciously-controlling-it.html

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Re: Questions for Rebecca

Postby Redtopgun123 » 03 Apr 2012 22:56

Hey Rebecca I am new i've been reading the stuff on the world of lucid dreaming and it looks fun but how long do you think it will take to become a lucid.


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