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Re: Problems getting back to sleep after WBTB

Posted: 18 Jun 2011 01:03
by fineganswaker
Peter,

First, if you have an inclination to use your dreams (or anything else) for any kind of creative pursuits, I would strongly urge you to do it. Yeah, I'm a 9-to-5 working stiff, but in many ways I've structured my entire life around creative pursuits. I think children's stories based on dreams is a great idea, and have often wondered if that's where guys like Shel Silverstein and Maurice Sendak got their ideas in the first place.*

Thanks for the clarification on the 1%. Yes, I totally, agree. I've had dreams over my entire life that have been so vivid that, now thinking back on them, I'm surprise I didn't go lucid with 'em. As a matter of fact, that second "silver moon" dream I had last week was really like that. It's strange to say, but I almost have this feeling that becoming lucid would have actually spoiled that dream in a way--it was so damned good! And the fact that I remembered the moon from the other dream--the odd "chaining" phenomenon--without become lucid, is something really interesting to me in itself.

I feel that I'm at the stage of my LD development where, once I recognize a dream sign, I really need to work on recognizing that same dream sign during the day--and then of course do a reality check. I'm not really there yet, but I've had successes. And when I have them they feel like I've caught the brass ring.

* Beat writer Jack Kerouac also kept scrupulous dream journals and ended up writing many of them out as poetry--eventually publishing them in his Mexico City Blues.

Re: Problems getting back to sleep after WBTB

Posted: 23 Jun 2011 05:13
by Peter
* Beat writer Jack Kerouac also kept scrupulous dream journals and ended up writing many of them out as poetry--eventually publishing them in his Mexico City Blues.

Just ordered a copy this book, it looks interesting

Peter