Dream Work

For general lucid chat - ask questions, share advice, set lucid dream challenges and explore the lucid realm together.
TillyPink
Posts: 143
Joined: 07 Nov 2013 22:57

Dream Work

Postby TillyPink » 01 Dec 2013 22:49

Had an interesting conversation with my Dad earlier who does a lot of dream work in a more Jungian psychoanalytical way. He is a bit skeptical about the idea of just focusing on LD'ing and really wanted to know what i meant. When i described the basic idea he just said that he experiences 'lucidity' (or imaginative, as he put it) dreams frequently, in fact he said the majority of his dreams held awareness of dreaming. Interestingly, he described what i have learned to be the 'WILD' experience, he said often people will nap in the day and fall into an immediate dream state which is semiconscious...or often fully conscious. I'm sharing this as I wonder if it may help if people are struggling to create lucidity, if one focuses on dream work in general, and not to get too hung up on having that amazing lucid dream. To examine dreams, and not be looking only to create lucidity but to value the deep dream state experience as highly as the lucid dream state. That in itself can create a natural lucid state as we are then running a freight train fluently from the unconscious to the conscious. I know many of us do, and i know that techniques for attaining lucidity cover things like keeping a dream journal, meditation etc. But I believe this is why i too have natural lucid experiences, although I think for me focusing on deepening the experience of lucidity is very exciting and goes into territories that have not been fully explored in modern science. Hardly touched upon in fact. So there is a gulf. But i think we are here creating the bridge!

The Beach Boy
Posts: 60
Joined: 20 Oct 2013 21:20

Re: Dream Work

Postby The Beach Boy » 01 Dec 2013 23:09

I don't really get what you mean, care to try to summarize it for a young kid like me? I am interested in your topic.

TillyPink
Posts: 143
Joined: 07 Nov 2013 22:57

Re: Dream Work

Postby TillyPink » 01 Dec 2013 23:28

haha ok...well I guess I'm having a philosophical moment. Very simply put...if someone was surfing the net, for eg, and discovered the possibility of lucid dreaming, it would appear as so utterly exciting (especially for someone young and eager to experience that fun and freedom) it would then also be possible to get so hung up on lucid dreaming that one might bypass the idea of working with dreams and the unconscious in general and get stuck in to learning techniques to attain LD'ing. Then perhaps (and i have read posts on this) get the feeling that they are doing something wrong or it's just not working out. The techniques are brilliant, but I guess the issue my dad brought up was that it's important to listen and examine ALL dream experiences, and then this in itself can create lucidity. To examine dreams i mean by finding personal meaning within them, to look at issues or experiences in waking life which may relate to the dreams (lucid or non-lucid) and this conversation with the unconscious (your deep self) can bring about a deeper understanding of yourself (it's why people go to therapy also) and then the dreaming experience becomes richer, and thus lucidity may follow as a natural progression. My lordy that was not simply put at all. But hope it helps. :? When i was 14 i had so many vivid dreams, and i learned to understand the meaning of them and how they related to my life at the time. I wanted to work with them as i knew it would help me. Some time later i started to have lucid dreams, and i think that was due to the way i explored my vivid dreams, and my dreams in general.

User avatar
taniaaust1
Posts: 2990
Joined: 07 Feb 2013 15:32
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Re: Dream Work

Postby taniaaust1 » 04 Dec 2013 00:08

TillyPink wrote:Had an interesting conversation with my Dad earlier who does a lot of dream work in a more Jungian psychoanalytical way. He is a bit skeptical about the idea of just focusing on LD'ing and really wanted to know what i meant. When i described the basic idea he just said that he experiences 'lucidity' (or imaginative, as he put it) dreams frequently, in fact he said the majority of his dreams held awareness of dreaming. Interestingly, he described what i have learned to be the 'WILD' experience, he said often people will nap in the day and fall into an immediate dream state which is semiconscious...or often fully conscious. I'm sharing this as I wonder if it may help if people are struggling to create lucidity, if one focuses on dream work in general, and not to get too hung up on having that amazing lucid dream. To examine dreams, and not be looking only to create lucidity but to value the deep dream state experience as highly as the lucid dream state. That in itself can create a natural lucid state as we are then running a freight train fluently from the unconscious to the conscious. I know many of us do, and i know that techniques for attaining lucidity cover things like keeping a dream journal, meditation etc. But I believe this is why i too have natural lucid experiences, although I think for me focusing on deepening the experience of lucidity is very exciting and goes into territories that have not been fully explored in modern science. Hardly touched upon in fact. So there is a gulf. But i think we are here creating the bridge!


Thanks for this post.

I'd like to add that LDs can be a biproduct of various other things not just from the study of dreams itself when as you said can trigger off spontanous LD. Something like some forms of meditation which increases self awareness too can possibly lead to spontanous LDs, so an energywork. I myself got into LD as a biproduct of other things.

Im glad to see what you said in your post about your father saying many have LDs during the day.. that is a common time for me to do them too. I dont have to worry as much about "falling asleep and being unaware" as I do if I go to bed when tired and try to have one.. it can be easier to keep awareness for an LD during the day if one can go to sleep or relax enough then and as your father says, one can possibly go straight into a LD.

I dont know why but many on this board are against trying it during the day.. where for some it can work rather well and actually have better success for some. (for those who struggle to remember their dreams and for those who try to WILD at other times during the night but just fall into a non LD dream.. trying it during the day may be the way to go).
The only thing to fear is the fear itself

TillyPink
Posts: 143
Joined: 07 Nov 2013 22:57

Re: Dream Work

Postby TillyPink » 07 Dec 2013 01:16

Yea I was ill for a while with a kind of chronic fatigue thing, and I would take afternoon naps and often compare them (before i got to know about LD'ing as a concept in itself) to Shamanic type trances or 'journeys' as i would slip directly into conscious dreaming. But the basic premise of what i was trying to say is 'Make friends with your unconscious. Enjoy the dream specter. Engage with the unseen. Explore your self.' The psychoanalytic world is limited though, and i think some get stuck there (my dad!) Funny. That very night i went to bed and had such a deep array of lucid dreams and some sleep paralysis stuff (that i'm going to throw open to this great group) that it was almost like my unconscious was saying....BUT LOOK, there is SO much more to dreaming then self centered projection! And i texted my dad the very next morning and told him so as i still don't think people who are involved with dream work in a psycho-dynamic aspect (both Freudian and Jung) really get LD'ing as a concept. Or believe it even. It IS different. But i value dreaming just as much. For it is what has taken me here. In fact my natural dream patterns have become more memorable and vivid for working with LD'ing in the way that we do on here. The gulf! Back to the gulf. It exists and we are like here on the edge of opening up a whole new meaning to the unconscious world in general, i really think that! And it's so good to share about it!! Thanks!

User avatar
HAGART
Posts: 3179
Joined: 05 Jan 2012 21:09
Location: CANADA

Re: Dream Work

Postby HAGART » 07 Dec 2013 02:28

Lucid dreaming isn't something you can study in a text book and become an expert.

You can't learn the physics of motion and then become an expert basketball player.
You have to practice and exercise. And don't plan to join the NBA or the Olympics. Just enjoy 'shooting hoops' in your backyard and be content with that. It's suppose to be fun, not work!

I too started lucid dreaming, simply by remembering my dreams over many years and getting to know them. I recall and analyze them often when awake, so when in a dream I find it easier to notice common dream signs. "This reminds me of a dream.... Oh yea! IT IS!"

Get to know your own dreams inside and out and become very familiar with them. They usually are accompanied by a 'feeling' too, a certain way of thinking that is more intuitive and illogical. I can sometimes just recognize that I'm not thinking straight and become spontaneously lucid with that.

Anyway, if everybody stopped trying so hard and just enjoyed and remembered their own dreams, I think in time they would become lucid eventually. And it grows exponentially from there, learning from each experience. I sometimes have to remind myself of all this. Don't compare yourself to others and enjoy YOUR dreams, lucid or not.
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

TillyPink
Posts: 143
Joined: 07 Nov 2013 22:57

Re: Dream Work

Postby TillyPink » 07 Dec 2013 02:40

HAGART wrote:Lucid dreaming isn't something you can study in a text book and become an expert.

You can't learn the physics of motion and then become an expert basketball player.
You have to practice and exercise. And don't plan to join the NBA or the Olympics. Just enjoy 'shooting hoops' in your backyard and be content with that. It's suppose to be fun, not work!

I too started lucid dreaming, simply by remembering my dreams over many years and getting to know them. I recall and analyze them often when awake, so when in a dream I find it easier to notice common dream signs. "This reminds me of a dream.... Oh yea! IT IS!"

Get to know your own dreams inside and out and become very familiar with them. They usually are accompanied by a 'feeling' too, a certain way of thinking that is more intuitive and illogical. I can sometimes just recognize that I'm not thinking straight and become spontaneously lucid with that.

Anyway, if everybody stopped trying so hard and just enjoyed and remembered their own dreams, I think in time they would become lucid eventually. And it grows exponentially from there, learning from each
experience. I sometimes have to remind myself of all this. Don't compare yourself to others and enjoy YOUR dreams, lucid or not.


Ahhh...exactly HAGART! Love the basketball analogy.


Return to “General Lucid Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest