Lucid Dreams as a Child?

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tpratt
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Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby tpratt » 18 Jun 2014 21:57

I think I had lucid dreams as a child. Would that make it easier for me to do now? Or does it just come that easily to children?

I'm pretty positive they were lucid, though I was doing the same thing most of the time. The ones I most clearly remember were of me reading books. My favorite thing to do as a child was read, and I was always upset that wasn't allowed to stay up later and read. So I'd put the book down by my bed and stare at it longingly until I fell asleep.

Once asleep, I'd pick the book back up, sit up in bed, and read. And it wasn't like a dream where I was watching myself read. I was definitely reading the pages, word for word. Thoughts and reactions hit me like they normally would. Then I'd wake up and be a chapter behind, and none of those things happened. I was very confused because I thought I'd actually gotten up and read it!

(I described the dream because I'm still trying to lucid dream, and I'd like to know if this is how a lucid dream should go.)
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torakrubik
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby torakrubik » 18 Jun 2014 22:09

What you have described sounds like a false awakening. They are a bit weird as the transition is so smooth and it's confusing when you finally wake up for real. A false awakening is just a type of dream, not necessarily lucid (Though they can be).
Dreaming is my drug

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tpratt
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby tpratt » 18 Jun 2014 22:56

Thanks. I wasn't sure because it was always different with different chapters. Also wasn't sure if you could get those without lucid dreaming. I wasn't even confused when I woke up. It was later in the day when I went to pick up the book, that I was lost. Like, "I swear I read this chapter yesterday." But upon waking up everything felt normal.
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nesgirl
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby nesgirl » 19 Jun 2014 03:29

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Last edited by nesgirl on 21 May 2015 07:00, edited 1 time in total.
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tpratt
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby tpratt » 19 Jun 2014 17:45

Oh! I remember that cartoon! It was so sweet that they got to be happy. Thanks for the info!
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Snaggle
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby Snaggle » 21 Jun 2014 10:47

Your experiences were incubated dreams. You should have no problem incubating lucid dreams with the DILD or WBTB methods.

Once asleep, I'd pick the book back up, sit up in bed, and read. And it wasn't like a dream where I was watching myself read. I was definitely reading the pages, word for word. Thoughts and reactions hit me like they normally would. Then I'd wake up and be a chapter behind, and none of those things happened. I was very confused because I thought I'd actually gotten up and read it!


One can incubate any sort of dream, e.g. I've incubated original books and read them while in HI and not all of them were in english or modern English. One does not need to lucid dream to use incubation for a practical end either, e.g. the famous example being Thomas Edison whom went to sleep with a silver dollar on his forehead and a bucket of water in front of him. shortly after he fell asleep in the most early stage of sleep/dreaming (HI/AKA Hypnagogia/ hypnagogic images) the dollar would fall into the bucket waking him up and allowing him to see his HI which are normally more creative than conscious thought.
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HAGART
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Re: Lucid Dreams as a Child?

Postby HAGART » 24 Jun 2014 01:09

tpratt wrote:So I'd put the book down by my bed and stare at it longingly until I fell asleep.


That's the key. I tend to start dreaming about something that's on my mind and long for too. If I have the intention to stay awake and aware when I fall back asleep I often find myself in a "dream-bed" trying to sleep! It certainly is in the category of false awakenings, even though technically is should be a 'false sleepening'. One time I was thirsty but too lazy to fetch some water, and I dreamed that I got up and drank a glass of water!

It doesn't matter how old you are, but the same principal works. It could be anything, but for you it was a book, and a desire to stay up reading it. That desire to stay awake as you fall asleep is key. Mind awake while the body sleeps. Getting up and exploring your dream is up to you once you figure it out. (IF you figure it out.... I get duped a lot by those false awakenings!)
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.


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