What's the point?

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Jackson
Posts: 110
Joined: 04 Jul 2013 03:02

What's the point?

Postby Jackson » 16 Jul 2014 23:57

Hello everybody. I haven't posted in a while because of issues with school and whatnot and I have begun to seriously consider; "What's the point of lucid dreaming?" I am not going to say anymore because what I say could very well influence your own opinions and I wouldn't want that, lol.

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Summerlander
Posts: 3639
Joined: 22 Sep 2011 19:52

Re: What's the point?

Postby Summerlander » 17 Jul 2014 00:23

Well, it's a great hobby to me and sometimes I wake up with a natural buzz. What's the point in taking drugs? LOL!

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

Jackson
Posts: 110
Joined: 04 Jul 2013 03:02

Re: What's the point?

Postby Jackson » 17 Jul 2014 00:29

Summerlander wrote:Well, it's a great hobby to me and sometimes I wake up with a natural buzz. What's the point in taking drugs? LOL!

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So it is purely for experiential reasons? Our brains mindlessly seeking pleasure in any way it can?

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nesgirl
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Joined: 25 May 2014 23:10

Re: What's the point?

Postby nesgirl » 17 Jul 2014 00:43

...
Last edited by nesgirl on 21 May 2015 06:08, edited 1 time in total.
Goodbye forever...
I dare you Summer and Deschain, to find where I am hiding, and try to attack.

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Summerlander
Posts: 3639
Joined: 22 Sep 2011 19:52

Re: What's the point?

Postby Summerlander » 17 Jul 2014 00:52

Jackson wrote:
Summerlander wrote:Well, it's a great hobby to me and sometimes I wake up with a natural buzz. What's the point in taking drugs? LOL!

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So it is purely for experiential reasons? Our brains mindlessly seeking pleasure in any way it can?

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Ultimately... yes. :D
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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SGMGI
Posts: 7
Joined: 22 Feb 2014 17:25
Location: North

Re: What's the point?

Postby SGMGI » 17 Jul 2014 12:36

Life is Short
Before we get into the specifics of how to have lucid dreams, let’s take a closer look at the reasons for learning to
awaken in your dreams. Do the potential benefits jus-fy the time and effort required for mastering lucid
dreaming? We think so, but read on and decide for your-self.
Proverbially, and undeniably, life is short. To make matters worse, we must spend between a quarter and half of
our lives asleep. Most of us are in the habit of virtually sleepwalking through our dreams. We sleep, mindlessly,
through many thousands of opportunities to be fully aware and alive.

Is sleeping through your dreams the best use of your limited lifespan? Not only are you wasting part of your finite
store of time to be alive, but you are missing adventures and lessons that could enrich the rest of your life. By
awakening to your dreams, you will add to your experience of life and, if you use these added hours of lucidity to
experiment and exercise your mind, you can also improve your enjoyment of your waking hours.
“Dreams are a reservoir of knowledge and experi-ence, “ writes Tibetan Buddhist Tarthang Tulku, “yet they are
often overlooked as a vehicle for exploring reality. In the dream state our bodies are at rest, yet we see and hear,
move about, and are even able to learn. When we make good use of the dream state, it is almost as if our lives
were doubled: instead of a hundred years, we live two hundred.”2
We can carry not only knowledge but also moods from the lucid dream state to the waking state. When we
awaken laughing with delight from a wonderful lucid dream, it isn’t surprising that our waking mood has been
brightened with feelings of joy. A young woman’s first lucid dream, which she had after reading an article about
lucid dreaming, provides a vivid example. Upon realiz-ing she was dreaming, she “tried to remember the advice
in the article, “ but the only thing that came to mind was a notion of her own: “ultimate experience.” She felt
herself taken over by a “blissful sensation of blending and melting with colors and light” that continued, “opening
up into a total ‘orgasm ‘ “Afterward, she “gently floated into waking consciousness” and was left with “a feeling
of bubbling joy” that persisted for a week or more. 3
This carryover of positive feeling into the waking state is an important aspect of lucid dreaming. Dreams,
remembered or not, often color our mood upon awakening, sometimes for a good part of a day. Just as the
negative aftereffect of “bad” dreams can cause you to feel as if you got up on the wrong side of the bed, the
positive feelings of a pleasant dream can give you an emotional uplift, helping you to start the day with
confidence and energy. This is all the more true of inspirational lucid dreams.
Perhaps you are still thinking, “My dream life is in-teresting enough as it is. Why should I make an effort to
enhance my awareness of it?” If so, consider the tradi-tional mystical teaching that holds that most of humanity is
asleep. When Idries Shah, the preeminent Sufi teacher, was asked to name “a fundamental mistake of man’s, “ he
replied, “To think that he is alive, when he has merely fallen asleep in life’s waiting room.”4
Lucid dreaming can help us understand Shah’s words. Once you have had the experience of realizing that you are
dreaming and that your possibilities are far greater than you had thought, you can imagine what a similar
realization would be like in your waking life. As Thoreau put it, “Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake.”

These are the words of Stephan Laberge, from the book "Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming". Its a very good read for anyone trying to become an avid lucid dreamer, I highly recommend giving it a read.
Alice came to a fork in the road. 'Which road do I take?' she asked.
'Where do you want to go?' responded the Cheshire Cat.
'I don't know,' Alice answered.
'Then,' said the Cat, 'it doesn't matter.

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Summerlander
Posts: 3639
Joined: 22 Sep 2011 19:52

Re: What's the point?

Postby Summerlander » 17 Jul 2014 13:27

Yeah, agree. Stephen LaBerge's literature is highly commendable. It will give you a better understanding of the advantages that lucid dreaming can entail and it will leave you wanting to explore your own mind as a conscious sleeper more and more...

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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Peter
Posts: 1951
Joined: 26 May 2011 08:02
Location: New Zealand

Re: What's the point?

Postby Peter » 18 Jul 2014 21:41

That makes as much sense to me as what is the point of breathing or living
Who are you I asked, the reply "dont be silly, we are your daughers" many years before they were born

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Jack Reacher
Posts: 490
Joined: 21 Jan 2012 05:03
Location: New Zealand

Re: What's the point?

Postby Jack Reacher » 19 Jul 2014 05:44

Well you make the point, its your dream. If you don't see a point in it, don't do it?

For me, I do it simply because the minds limits and potential fascinates me, and it brings about a very creative environment.
"There is theoretical abstraction, and then there is true abstraction."

TillyPink
Posts: 143
Joined: 07 Nov 2013 22:57

Re: What's the point?

Postby TillyPink » 05 Aug 2014 00:19

SGMGI (what does it stand for?) I just popped on here after quite a long time of not doing so to read your post I think. I was reading it thinking...well, they did ask! :D I'm all nodded out.


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