Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

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nesgirl
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby nesgirl » 15 Nov 2014 04:02

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 15 Nov 2014 15:44

"As for as the non-existence..."

Yeah. I'll never reject an idea simply because it makes me uncomfortable. At least we can enjoy the illusion of having free will.

"I never said..."

Wow, I guess I really have to point this out to you because you can't figure it out:
No, you wouldn't be able to clone. You wouldn't have the expertise and even if you did you wouldn't be able to make it to a science laboratory that is properly equipped.

Cannibalism: what I said was that if that was what was required, I would do it. There would be nothing I wouldn't do for the perpetuation of humanity. It's pretty shocking and revealing that there are things you wouldn't do.

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Well said.

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nesgirl
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby nesgirl » 15 Nov 2014 19:26

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Summerlander
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby Summerlander » 17 Nov 2014 14:41

You may say that about cannibalism now, nesgirl, but would that view survive if you were starving? This is where imagination can help. I'm not saying you would commit murder in order to feed but you would probably be tempted to eat someone who had already died...

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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nesgirl
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby nesgirl » 17 Nov 2014 20:58

...
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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 17 Nov 2014 22:00

The entire world is a nuclear, irradiated winterland, nesgirl. You're missing the point and meaning of a hypothetical.

This calls to mind a scene from one of my favorite novels: "The Stand" by Stephen King. Basically, 99.9% of the population is swiftly wiped out by a superflu nicknamed "Captain Trips." A choice few people have the genetic mutation that makes them totally immune. One of the characters (who is genetically immune) is in a small state penitentiary when the flu comes through. After a week or so, everyone in the prison (wardens and prisoners) is either dead or has fled, leaving the character behind in the jail cell. Weeks pass. There's only the silence. He has tried literally everything he can think of to break out of the cell, but nothing has worked.
He slowly starts to starve to death.
A dead, rotting body is in the jail cell just adjacent to his, and he thinks that it is easily within reach. As the torturous days lug by, that pallid, melted forearm starts to look extremely delicious...
(If I recall, Randall Flagg--the main antagonist of the novel--finds him and liberates him before he actually starts eating people.)
But that's the point of the hypothetical. IF there was no other option, WOULD you do it?

I certainly would. The idea sounds repulsive to the utmost degree at the moment, but I know the nature of starvation and human depravity enough to know that that would not be an obstacle for me if I was genuinely starving to death.
Well said.

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nesgirl
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby nesgirl » 17 Nov 2014 22:35

...
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Goodbye forever...
I dare you Summer and Deschain, to find where I am hiding, and try to attack.

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 17 Nov 2014 23:23

Get ready for yet another of my characteristically dark comments...

The salinity of blood plasma and lymph is very high, as the vast majority of sodium is stored in such fluids. If you've ever tasted blood, you would be familiar with its salty, alkaline taste. That is why. So, potentially, that could be an option for you...

Honestly, if I was in the predicament portrayed in that scene, I would try to find a way to kill myself before the pain of starvation set in, tempting me to endure the horrors of consuming a human being. My will to live is not exactly soaring.

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Well said.

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nesgirl
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby nesgirl » 18 Nov 2014 02:58

...
Last edited by nesgirl on 21 May 2015 03:12, edited 1 time in total.
Goodbye forever...
I dare you Summer and Deschain, to find where I am hiding, and try to attack.

jasmine2
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby jasmine2 » 18 Nov 2014 04:10

I think most people nowadays, when they observe what's going on in Middle Eastern countries, see mostly endless ethnic and religious sectarian violence and bloodshed.

Even though ISIS and many other terrorists groups vow to wage war on America, their main destructive efforts seem to be aimed at any group of people, Muslim or otherwise, who are deemed to not be "True Followers" of the alarmingly strict and narrow religious views of the terrorists.

It is tremendously sad that many thousands of people in this region have hardened their hearts to feelings of empathy or common emotional ground regarding others they feel are "too different" from themselves.

However, behind all of this swirling cloud of chaos, there still lives on a remarkable voice of peace - the poems of the poet Rumi, who is much beloved in all Islamic countries, and in many other nations.

From Wikipedia article - "Rumi" -
"Rumi ... was a 13th century Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. Rumi's importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic boundaries ... His poems have been widely translated into many of the world's languages ... He has been described as 'the most popular poet in America' ... "

Coleman Barks is perhaps the best known English translator of Rumi's poems. I recommend the following video -

YouTube - Coleman Barks - "Rumi and The Play Of Poetry" -
University of California Television (1:47:31 min.)
Coleman Barks reads Rumi's wonderfully gentle, melodious, often numinous poems, which express love for all people, and awareness of deep, sacred connection with all and things in the wider world.


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