Introduction and question

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GhostDancing
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Joined: 18 Feb 2012 15:06

Introduction and question

Postby GhostDancing » 18 Feb 2012 15:23

Hello,
I'm new to this forum. In the 1980's I became interested in lucid dreaming and altered states of awareness but then other things drew my attention. I had several lucid dreams many years ago, but none recently. Since I've been away, I wonder if cultivating lucid dreaming has been shown in studies to have any practical value, or if anyone has looked at practical correlates of lucid dreaming. I might guess that L.D. might relate to creativity, psychological mastery over fears, etc. Can anyone point me in a direction to learn more?

Please don't take my question to imply that for something like lucid dreaming to have value, it must have a practical application. If it is fun or interesting, it has value.

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Peter
Posts: 1951
Joined: 26 May 2011 08:02
Location: New Zealand

Re: Introduction and question

Postby Peter » 18 Feb 2012 21:07

I would say all of the above - so start dreaming and share your thougths and experiances

Peter
Who are you I asked, the reply "dont be silly, we are your daughers" many years before they were born

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lucidinthe sky
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Joined: 10 Dec 2011 22:37
Location: Sacramento, California

Re: Introduction and question

Postby lucidinthe sky » 18 Feb 2012 21:33

There's quite a bit of information available about the benefits of lucid dreaming both on this site and on other sites. Rather than give my incomplete version of the answer, I think you're better off reading the more comprehensive information that has already been written.
Have you ever had a dream, Neo, that you were so sure was real? What if you were unable to wake from that dream? How would you know the difference between the dream world and the real world? Morpheus

GhostDancing
Posts: 6
Joined: 18 Feb 2012 15:06

Re: Introduction and question

Postby GhostDancing » 19 Feb 2012 18:07

Thank you for the replies. I found some research and one of the findings was very unexpected. A study at Cornell using undergraduates found a very reliable positive correlation between students who reported lucid dreaming and depression. This was counter to what the research expected. The researcher ventured to guess that there was something that both lucid dreamers and depressives share, not that lucid dreaming causes depression. I was also surprised to find that a search query on the largest international database for psychoanalytic publications yielded no articles or studies related to lucid dreaming.
Again, thanks for your replies.

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Peter
Posts: 1951
Joined: 26 May 2011 08:02
Location: New Zealand

Re: Introduction and question

Postby Peter » 19 Feb 2012 20:01

I would guess that the link will be due to the depression leading to a big internal focus and this flowing on via subconsious to the dream state. I bet these people are always tired and also have broken sleep and that may also be the simple link. Exhaustion leading to spontanious WILD
Who are you I asked, the reply "dont be silly, we are your daughers" many years before they were born

Toby
Posts: 23
Joined: 02 Sep 2011 08:44

Re: Introduction and question

Postby Toby » 20 Feb 2012 16:50

Hi ghostdancing!

yes, knowing the psychoanalytic community a little, I would say that there is very little interest in lucid dreaming (which is an pity). But I recently learnt that C. G. Jung hat lots of out-of-body-experiences, even during therapy. He says that he felt often floating between himself and the patient during sessions and that this gave him a both a higher perspective and a deeper insight into the unconscious. Having read some of his books as well as parts of his famous "red book" (where he describes his dreams and visions) I'm absolutely convinced that he must have been a lucid dreamer although he as fas as I know didn't know or use the term "lucid dreaming".

I hope for a good dream next night... Toby

GhostDancing
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Joined: 18 Feb 2012 15:06

Re: Introduction and question

Postby GhostDancing » 21 Feb 2012 04:25

Yes, Jung was a man who moved beyond the teachings of Freud to establish a novel approach to psychoanalysis. Freud was very concerned about the legitimacy of psychoanalysis in the eyes of the scientific community, and disowned Jung when Jung deviated radically from Freudian libido theory. Some of Jung's conduct that concerned Freud is conveyed in the recent movie "Dangerous Method". Both Freud and Jung were deeply affected by the schism that eventually led to the banishment of Jung from Freud's inner circle. But Jung continued to produce ideas that captured the imagination of people worldwide. With regard to dreams, Jung propagated the notion of archetypes and the collective unconscious. Freud's view of dreams was much more narrow and thought to related specifically to the unconscious of the dreamer.

I still find it odd that psychoanalysts haven't picked up the idea of lucid dreaming given all there attention to dreams.

Toby
Posts: 23
Joined: 02 Sep 2011 08:44

Re: Introduction and question

Postby Toby » 21 Feb 2012 09:46

Hi GhostDancing!

Thank s you for drawing my attention to the movie "Dangerous method"! It seems to be currently in german cinema, or perhaps I'll just wait for the DVD. I also cannot understand why lucid dreaming gets so little attention. Take another example. Take the most current book in german on psychiatry by Laux and Kapfhammer. Remember: it is THE standard text, over 2500 pages. You won't even find the word dream in the index, let alone lucid dream. I don't know what result this "experiment" would yield with an english "standard textbook".

What I experience in LD would in a waking state be often called psychosis. Although I feel quite fine about it. I talked to a psychologist recently about Jung, and she said: "Don't read these books! That man was schizophrenic!" I'm afraid many professional psychos are prejudiced about altered states of mind (as LD) and regard them uniformly as pathological.

If this is true, I wouldn't be surprised if you find an article about the "treatment of lucid dreaming disorder".

Toby

GhostDancing
Posts: 6
Joined: 18 Feb 2012 15:06

movies and lucid dreaming

Postby GhostDancing » 26 Feb 2012 13:20

Hi Toby,
If you like movies and lucid dreaming, I would also recommend "Waking Life" http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/waking_life/trailers/10896918/ and, of course "Inception" http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/inception/trailers/, "Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind". I think there is something that artists are sensing about a new era where technology and imagination merge to create new realities.


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