Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

For all other chat which isn't directly related to lucid dreaming and the world of sleep and dreams.
lucidé
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby lucidé » 22 Mar 2018 05:55

Summerlander wrote:
I have a problem with this. So let me just iterate some epistemological facts here. You can only be 100% sure of your experience and nobody else's. You experienced robes in dreams but the others could meretriciously tell you the same for the sole reason of assenting to your dream meshing view and without having necessarily experienced what is required. :ugeek:


I asked a couple of my friends what they wore in their lucid dreams before I told them what I wore in mine, and they told me what they wore before I told them. The sash glowing like I said, was just a dream symbol that was not within my control, and my lucid dream friend later told me it happened in their lucid dream the time I saw it happened to my friend's DC in my lucid dream. It was more or less just a password dream meshing symbol, nothing more or less. Often they would talk about their lucid dreams before I would talk about mine.

Dream meshing as I mentioned before isn't mutual dreaming, as my friends and I weren't having the same dream. We were only attempting to match symbols we had, nothing more or less. There is no reason for you to have me escorted to the psych ward over it either.

What is required is evidence, not anecdotage and hearsay. Your brains would have to be scanned for clues and, ideally, your dreams recorded and transcribed into something intelligible. You need a scientific witness---a third nonparticipant/party, if you will---to confirm what is going on.

While not with the dream meshing, when I had that incident with the the crime scene, the psychiatrist did want them to do a EEG test. As far as why the test results showed unconsciousness, my psychiatrist explained abnormal amounts of DMT can sometimes cause a false unconsciousness reading in an EEG.

All I see in your statements is your experience sprinkled with fantasies and preconceptions about those around you and the course of events. Answer me this, lucide: On a scale of nought to ten, how wishful is your thinking? I'm serious. :mrgreen:


Some of my science oriented family and friends don't believe I can lucid dream either (with one of my family members using evidence against me to prove it). If you don't believe I am able to lucid dream, then you aren't the only one

I know my thinking isn't just wishful, as even if it was just a lucid dream, I know what I experienced. I was free from my disabilities and saw my friends' DCs freed from theirs. Sure it is near impossible for that to happen in real life (and my psychiatrist told me it was scientifically impossible) for a person to be freed from a disability, but I know without a doubt I am free in those lucid dreams. When I was a teenager, I just thought I was a bad person because they told me in middle school I was. I usually believed when I ended up in some of my lucid dreams when I was freed from the disability I was free from being a horrible person.
Also, the ability to escape made me less prone to attempting those disappearing acts during and after middle school. I don't think anyone really cares I failed at most of those magic tricks, and many probably wanted to succeed at one of them.

If you need help answering that question, try pondering over these: How badly do you want your world view to be true? How much confirmation do you need for your experiences? :|

I mostly only want confirmation for not being disabled. Personally don't really care about the spying. Spying is okay, but for me, it was probably as much fun as matching lottery numbers (I don't really care that much about winning a lottery, maybe that's why). If someone doesn't care about winning lottery numbers or at the slots, even winning very often at them wouldn't matter. Even if spying is luck based, trust me, if you got lucky too many times in a row, you'd get so tired of the fact, you'd wish you'd have no luck at all. You can only have that same lucid dream, same day of the year, or same whatever happen so many times before your mind goes crazy. This is why a user must be creative and come up with all sorts of different ideas, and not just stick with the same idea.

You don't just love lucid dreaming, you see it as your salvation---the escapist's holy grail ticket to a virtual hereafter! So this hopeful salvation of yours begins to look a little grim when you're eternally alone with your thoughts. What is the point of eternal life if one is alone, if entertainment and company is nothing but a mirage, a mental illusion, the product of one's own mind?


If I didn't have lucid dreaming when I was in middle school and was bullied like that, I would have mostly likely suffered the same disappearing fate as most Utah teenagers who tried the disappearing act. It's one of the reasons why in high school I was allowed to get obsessed over it, because it allowed me to think of a different way to get over the PTSD.

Lucid dreams cannot hurt you. With the imagination a person has, they can create all sorts of characters with all sorts of personality, so they'll never be alone.
If there was a way to recreate my body like they describe ultimate immortality where I couldn't be hurt, I didn't suffer from mental disabilities, I could travel instantly from place to place and from universe to universe, and I had infinite knowledge, I would take that ability. The ability to keep going and infinitely see all universes evolve forever


Your virtual afterlife could quickly turn into a solipsistic nightmare in which you'd feel trapped forever! So far I spoke about you being hopeful, but this is where the wishful ostensibly comes in: You want the notion that people can psychically connect with one another to be true because this is the solution to your solipsistic nightmare. :geek:

I already know that people cannot psychically connect as that is impossible. I just wrote about that in a fairy tale as a possible afterlife ending for that fairy tale, just because most of the other ones sounded so horrible. My personal favorite story was the one about ultimate immortality, where everything that ever existed is restored and gains ultimate immortality. The ultimate immortality which allows invincibility and infinite knowledge, would allow for living on other planets and even travel to other universes to happen.
An example of lucid dreaming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7ps_VSPkg (1:46 Is that me or is this me? "Am I still dreaming?") Simpsons example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3X1n5Yny3g

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DawnXEye11
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby DawnXEye11 » 22 Mar 2018 12:59

Oh okay, i get it now. Thanks for explaining.: 3
Lucid dreaming will always be apart of me that I cherish. Even If I'm different.
【☆Have a sweet dream☆】(●UωU).zZZ

lucidé
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby lucidé » 22 Mar 2018 18:37

I know there is discrimination against disabilities in religions to the point in the past where they drowned and suffocated people, however, people who believe in science often don't treat people with disabilities or illnesses any better. You probably didn't know this, but often they are forced to consent to experiment lab studies to get the medications they need, so they are experimented on, sometimes to the point where the experiments kill them or even the scientists refuse to treat the subjects allowing the subjects to suffer a slow painful death (nearly happened to me once). I have been treated like a lab rat. I will also say because of this, I am likely to have a shortened lifespan. Many of the disabled have a shortened lifespan because the experiments take their toll on their immune system.
As for more experimentation in the labs over my lucid dreams, no thanks. Science has experimented on me enough as is, and has already shortened my lifespan enough. And aside from the one time I accidentally meshed with my nephew (he ended up having a natural DMT trip on accident), it's been 8 years since I last attempted dream meshing and I have no plans on attempting dream meshing again. I distrust others for the most part even if it is just symbol matching. I know what most guys if they saw me in real life would have other ideas of what they would want to lucid dream about if they put me in their lucid dream, as a few guys on another website made that one pretty clear. Even some females are getting to be the same as some of the guys these days.
An example of lucid dreaming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7ps_VSPkg (1:46 Is that me or is this me? "Am I still dreaming?") Simpsons example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3X1n5Yny3g

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Summerlander
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby Summerlander » 23 Mar 2018 13:34

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:
I have a problem with this. So let me just iterate some epistemological facts here. You can only be 100% sure of your experience and nobody else's. You experienced robes in dreams but the others could meretriciously tell you the same for the sole reason of assenting to your dream meshing view and without having necessarily experienced what is required. :ugeek:


I asked a couple of my friends what they wore in their lucid dreams before I told them what I wore in mine, and they told me what they wore before I told them. The sash glowing like I said, was just a dream symbol that was not within my control, and my lucid dream friend later told me it happened in their lucid dream the time I saw it happened to my friend's DC in my lucid dream.


It is possible that what they told you created a false memory in your mind about your lucid dreaming experiences. Like an inception that overrides the original memory of the lucid dream. Also, you can't even be sure that temporal coincidences took place; your ostensible matches could have been off by a few seconds or minutes in time.

Two questions:

1) Do you record your lucid dreams as soon as you wake up?

2) Can you 'dream mesh' and confirm hits every time you try to do it?

lucidé wrote:Dream meshing as I mentioned before isn't mutual dreaming, as my friends and I weren't having the same dream. We were only attempting to match symbols we had, nothing more or less. There is no reason for you to have me escorted to the psych ward over it either.


Nope, no reason at all because you just admitted to engaging in pattern-seeking. It seems to me that the source of your tale is confimation bias which is quite ubiquitous and prevalent in society. :idea:

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:What is required is evidence, not anecdotage and hearsay. Your brains would have to be scanned for clues and, ideally, your dreams recorded and transcribed into something intelligible. You need a scientific witness---a third nonparticipant/party, if you will---to confirm what is going on.

While not with the dream meshing, when I had that incident with the crime scene, the psychiatrist did want them to do a EEG test. As far as why the test results showed unconsciousness, my psychiatrist explained abnormal amounts of DMT can sometimes cause a false unconsciousness reading in an EEG.


Never heard of that one---not even the psychopharmacologist Rick Strassman mentioned anything like it in his comprehensive DMT: The Spirit Molecule (and I've read it). Either the machine wasn't working properly or the psychiatrist has been misinformed about EEG readings.

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:All I see in your statements is your experience sprinkled with fantasies and preconceptions about those around you and the course of events. Answer me this, lucide: On a scale of nought to ten, how wishful is your thinking? I'm serious. :mrgreen:


Some of my science oriented family and friends don't believe I can lucid dream either (with one of my family members using evidence against me to prove it). If you don't believe I am able to lucid dream, then you aren't the only one.


I never said that I don't believe you are able to lucid dream. In fact, most of us---provided that our brains are not in some way malfunctionally impaired (such as extreme bipolar cases)---can lucid dream.

Science has already confirmed the reality of lucid dreaming. It is undeniable since LaBerge popularised the famous experiment. You can also confirm it at first hand using simple methods. What I am more sceptical about is the idea behind dream meshing and the existence of symbols that can be accessed simultaneously by two or more parties at will. I am as sceptical of this as I am of Michael Persinger's parapsychological conclusions.

lucidé wrote:I know my thinking isn't just wishful, as even if it was just a lucid dream, I know what I experienced.


Do you though? Because memory and the anthropic habit of pattern-seeking can be tricky. Even I've had certain experiences that make my brain go 'Oooh ... What if?' and then Occam's razor discerps the head of such conjectural leaps when scepticism quicks in.

This isn't a case of me accusing you of madness; this is about you ostensibly displaying the tritely common habit of trying to link all the dots. Sometimes we are not even aware that we are trying so hard to match what could, in all fairness, just be unrelated phenomena.

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:If you need help answering that question, try pondering over these: How badly do you want your world view to be true? How much confirmation do you need for your experiences? :|


I mostly only want confirmation for not being disabled. Personally don't really care about the spying. Spying is okay, but for me, it was probably as much fun as matching lottery numbers (I don't really care that much about winning a lottery, maybe that's why). If someone doesn't care about winning lottery numbers or at the slots, even winning very often at them wouldn't matter. Even if spying is luck based, trust me, if you got lucky too many times in a row, you'd get so tired of the fact, you'd wish you'd have no luck at all. You can only have that same lucid dream, same day of the year, or same whatever happen so many times before your mind goes crazy. This is why a user must be creative and come up with all sorts of different ideas, and not just stick with the same idea.


I agree to an extent. It is true that we grow tired of repetition and seek novelty. In the case of being lucky all the time---or having the ability to always safely execute difficult or even dangerous tasks---deprives one of particularly strong thrills; some people thrive on a sense of danger and get an adrenaline rush. We all like a challenge from time to time.

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:You don't just love lucid dreaming, you see it as your salvation---the escapist's holy grail ticket to a virtual hereafter! So this hopeful salvation of yours begins to look a little grim when you're eternally alone with your thoughts. What is the point of eternal life if one is alone, if entertainment and company is nothing but a mirage, a mental illusion, the product of one's own mind?


If I didn't have lucid dreaming when I was in middle school and was bullied like that, I would have mostly likely suffered the same disappearing fate as most Utah teenagers who tried the disappearing act. It's one of the reasons why in high school I was allowed to get obsessed over it, because it allowed me to think of a different way to get over the PTSD.


I'm pleased for you. Glad lucid dreaming has positive impacts on people. Is 'the disappearing act' suicide, by any chance? Or am I missing your point?

lucidé wrote:Lucid dreams cannot hurt you. With the imagination a person has, they can create all sorts of characters with all sorts of personality, so they'll never be alone.


Yes, but ultimately the lucid dreamer is alone because he or she knows the undeniable truth that there is no real company but that which forms in their minds. It is pretty much like being alone with your thoughts---the oneironaut merely observes a range of mental experiences as he basks in an ultrarealistically galvanised sea of conceptions and vivid imagination subjectively come to life.

lucidé wrote:If there was a way to recreate my body like they describe ultimate immortality where I couldn't be hurt, I didn't suffer from mental disabilities, I could travel instantly from place to place and from universe to universe, and I had infinite knowledge, I would take that ability. The ability to keep going and infinitely see all universes evolve forever


So would I. It would be a form of survival. But I would be gutted about the fact that experience would be entirely fabricated by my brain if the scenario were that I'd be completely deprived of sensory input from the external world.

It would mean that I could never get wind of new discoveries about reality. In this vein, it is plain to see that I would also be deprived of what the scientist cherishes the most---the ability to question and probe the multifaceted objective world.

lucidé wrote:
Summerlander wrote:Your virtual afterlife could quickly turn into a solipsistic nightmare in which you'd feel trapped forever! So far I spoke about you being hopeful, but this is where the wishful ostensibly comes in: You want the notion that people can psychically connect with one another to be true because this is the solution to your solipsistic nightmare. :geek:


I already know that people cannot psychically connect as that is impossible. I just wrote about that in a fairy tale as a possible afterlife ending for that fairy tale, just because most of the other ones sounded so horrible. My personal favorite story was the one about ultimate immortality, where everything that ever existed is restored and gains ultimate immortality. The ultimate immortality which allows invincibility and infinite knowledge, would allow for living on other planets and even travel to other universes to happen.


Believe me, I am all for that. If such infinite abundance and the latency of eternity became tedious, I would seek real death (the cessation of my being). Does this sound horrible to you? :mrgreen:
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

lucidé
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby lucidé » 24 Mar 2018 02:54

Summerlander wrote:
It is possible that what they told you created a false memory in your mind about your lucid dreaming experiences. Like an inception that overrides the original memory of the lucid dream. Also, you can't even be sure that temporal coincidences took place; your ostensible matches could have been off by a few seconds or minutes in time.

Two questions:

1) Do you record your lucid dreams as soon as you wake up?

2) Can you 'dream mesh' and confirm hits every time you try to do it?


I will say the times my friends and I got the very best results is when 2 of us induced a WILD in the same room either because we were meditating, it was a classroom setting, or we were having a sleepover. Straight after both of us had a lucid dream, those symbols were very fresh in our memory. Actually one of the very first times I even attempted dream meshing with one friend, we were lucid dreaming at the same time in the same classroom, so attempting to remember symbols was easy 2 minutes after the lucid dream.

1) I am not as good about writing down my dreams as I was 8-14 years ago when I was meshing, but back then, I not only wrote about them, I drew pictures of my WILDs during class (since I induced WILDs during the early morning classss, it makes sense), and I’d put them into Flash animations. I am not as good about writing them these days, because some of my family and friends today discouraged me from talking about it, drawing them, or writing them down (it feels like a few of them want me to be something I’m not....a feminine mother that’s more into things like sewing and dresses)

2) Back then, I was able to match symbols with my friends almost every time. The reason was we all kept dream journals and our recall and abilities were very high. If recall and dream control are very high, all that’s left is using a system that can work in real life known as a random number generator (this has been proven to work many times). In other words, I had to use a math and physics system to figure out when that precise 1/4 second was. It’s possible to manipulate a RNG in real life, although it takes very precise timing to do so. Personally I believe James Randi manipulates the RNG himself to ensure low probability can never happen (it can be manipulated in this way), which it would take a true genius to do that (you’d have to be able to solve many math equations very fast). One of the reasons why I don’t mention I used RNG abuse for dream meshing too often is it’s considered in the same category as card counting/cheating which isn’t really supernatural as it is an unfair advantage over others, so many users really get super critical if they find out.


lucidé wrote:
Nope, no reason at all because you just admitted to engaging in pattern-seeking. It seems to me that the source of your tale is confimation bias which is quite ubiquitous and prevalent in society. :idea:

Never said what we did was real. I just said the type of symbol matching we ended up doing sometimes ended up like that of the lottery. I wouldn’t even go as far as to call dream spying real. The spying I would probably compare to a user picking up a winning lottery ticket.



Never heard of that one---not even the psychopharmacologist Rick Strassman mentioned anything like it in his comprehensive DMT: The Spirit Molecule (and I've read it). Either the machine wasn't working properly or the psychiatrist has been misinformed about EEG readings.

That Machine must not have been working correctly is what I am believing as well. Although, there was an interesting study in the experiment labs...many medications actually have the opposite or a different affect on me. Sedatives make me nervous, caffeine made me produce milk, etc. If DMT does cause different side effects on me, that might be why my experiences with such are different. It might also be why I am able to lucid dream easily while under its influence, like I was while KO’d during the medical procedure. What makes me pretty sure there had to be a drug such as DMT involved is because something in those lucid dreams allowed me to be free from my disability.


lucidé wrote:
I never said that I don't believe you are able to lucid dream. In fact, most of us---provided that our brains are not in some way malfunctionally impaired (such as extreme bipolar cases)---can lucid dream.

Science has already confirmed the reality of lucid dreaming. It is undeniable since LaBerge popularised the famous experiment. You can also confirm it at first hand using simple methods. What I am more sceptical about is the idea behind dream meshing and the existence of symbols that can be accessed simultaneously by two or more parties at will. I am as sceptical of this as I am of Michael Persinger's parapsychological conclusions.


There is no telepathy involved in the least. Think of it more among the lines that 2 designers remember to put the same symbols in their projects at the same time. The end result is that symbols will sound the same, but the designs will appear entirely different. Personally I don’t believe in the whole telepathy thing either. Symbol matching is mostly based on skill level and memory. Part of the symbol matching might be based on chance, but I will say with meshing, the symbols will never match 100%. The highest is around 90% and that’s usually if chance matches are involved. The average is around 75%-80% of matches symbols.



Do you though? Because memory and the anthropic habit of pattern-seeking can be tricky. Even I've had certain experiences that make my brain go 'Oooh ... What if?' and then Occam's razor discerps the head of such conjectural leaps when scepticism quicks in.

This isn't a case of me accusing you of madness; this is about you ostensibly displaying the tritely common habit of trying to link all the dots. Sometimes we are not even aware that we are trying so hard to match what could, in all fairness, just be unrelated phenomena.

Yes I am very sure I was free. My disability can at times cause a huge depression wave I cannot control. While some lucid dreams I have no control over that, there are very specific ones it feels like that depression melts away. Sometimes even I have fits of paranoia episodes, and they are gone as well. They seem to return as soon as I wake up from the lucid dream, reminding me of what I have to deal with.




I agree to an extent. It is true that we grow tired of repetition and seek novelty. In the case of being lucky all the time---or having the ability to always safely execute difficult or even dangerous tasks---deprives one of particularly strong thrills; some people thrive on a sense of danger and get an adrenaline rush. We all like a challenge from time to time.

Some sort of drug in that lucid dream seems to prevent me from feeling an adrenaline rush, so it ended up becoming boring.

[quote="Summerlander]

I'm pleased for you. Glad lucid dreaming has positive impacts on people. Is 'the disappearing act' suicide, by any chance? Or am I missing your point?[/quote]
Yes. When physical abuse (by my bullies) was so constant, and the verbal abuse I constantly received from my teachers was bad, I often would believe if I disappeared, maybe the teachers would be better off. My school psychologist even suggested that I should just make myself disappear.
In Utah, abuse by bullies is extremely high, and people from all groups are having issues of ending their misery.



[quote]Yes, but ultimately the lucid dreamer is alone because he or she knows the undeniable truth that there is no real company but that which forms in their minds. It is pretty much like being alone with your thoughts---the oneironaut merely observes a range of mental experiences as he basks in an ultrarealistically galvanised sea of conceptions and vivid imagination subjectively come to life.[/quote]
But for some people, being alone is better for them. Think about for example, the holocost, or maybe, someone in an abusive home.
Actually after I got out of that situation of being assaulted by my bullies constantly in middle school, I really did need some alone time. I really distrusted people after that. It got to the point even at the beginning of high school I’d hide under desks in the office and wouldn’t come out. If I had at that point been trapped in a coma and just lived in a lucid dream with the characters, I probably wouldn’t have been too unhappy with the end result since I distrusted people.

[quote]

So would I. It would be a form of survival. But I would be gutted about the fact that experience would be entirely fabricated by my brain if the scenario were that I'd be completely deprived of sensory input from the external world. [/quote]
One way at least I could tell if I was a human or not is if I had my super smell. Cannot use that ability in a lucid dream, and super smell is extremely useful for identification of living things.

[quote]It would mean that I could never get wind of new discoveries about reality. In this vein, it is plain to see that I would also be deprived of what the scientist cherishes the most---the ability to question and probe the multifaceted objective world.[/quote]
I believe there is more to learn than just what our current understanding is. The infinite knowledge and immortality would enable us to travel to other planets/universes and learn and question those world once we grew to understand our own.


[quote]
Believe me, I am all for that. If such infinite abundance and the latency of eternity became tedious, I would seek real death (the cessation of my being). Does this sound horrible to you? :mrgreen:[/quote]
The reason why I make up my own endings is because I got discriminated against by a close friend over my disability. The friend wouldn’t let me go to a ceremony and implied I deserved the bad ending, so I wouldn’t ruin their family’s good ending. Sometimes I make up endings where I am alone, because I will never forgive my friend.
I know you aren’t afraid and I respect this, but I am afraid of losing consciousness, because I’ve had very bad experiences with it. One of the main reasons is, I was unable to lucid dream (or even enter REM) for weeks due to clots cutting off much of my oxygen, which caused me to pass out instead of entering REM. Even when I was able to again, I had to limit my controls for months due to my low oxygen levels or I’d pass out. I still cannot get over the paranoia of passing out in a lucid dream because over the past 1/2 year, it happened too many times. What I keep believing is that’s just what death might be like. Where I all am trying to do is enjoy a lucid dream, then I get dizzy, and my consciousness fades. I had that happen one too many times, and it’s more frightening than you believe. I’d much rather have a lucid dream like that one I had during my shock where there is no stress, no signs of losing consciousness at that moment, I have no disability, friendly dream characters in a beautiful dream utopia who don’t discriminate. I really don’t want to lose consciousness, but it’s probably more preferable to that bad ending with that ex friend taunting me while I’m getting tortured.
An example of lucid dreaming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7ps_VSPkg (1:46 Is that me or is this me? "Am I still dreaming?") Simpsons example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3X1n5Yny3g

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Summerlander
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby Summerlander » 31 Mar 2018 00:57

lucidé wrote:I am not as good about writing them these days, because some of my family and friends today discouraged me from talking about it, drawing them, or writing them down (it feels like a few of them want me to be something I’m not....a feminine mother that’s more into things like sewing and dresses)


Sewing and dresses over potential oneiric creativity? That's preposterous! They did not have your interests at heart and care more about conserving image, tradition and retrograde stereotypes in order to assimilate to their generational circle of friends, I bet!

Stand your ground. Stay true to who you are. Creativity from lucid dreaming is a beautiful thing. You have a gift and a lot of potential. Not many can do what you do. You will never run out of ideas because every time you have writer's (or artist's) block, you can simply have a lucid dream for more inspiration.

lucidé wrote:2) Back then, I was able to match symbols with my friends almost every time. The reason was we all kept dream journals and our recall and abilities were very high. If recall and dream control are very high, all that’s left is using a system that can work in real life known as a random number generator (this has been proven to work many times). In other words, I had to use a math and physics system to figure out when that precise 1/4 second was. It’s possible to manipulate a RNG in real life, although it takes very precise timing to do so. Personally I believe James Randi manipulates the RNG himself to ensure low probability can never happen (it can be manipulated in this way), which it would take a true genius to do that (you’d have to be able to solve many math equations very fast). One of the reasons why I don’t mention I used RNG abuse for dream meshing too often is it’s considered in the same category as card counting/cheating which isn’t really supernatural as it is an unfair advantage over others, so many users really get super critical if they find out.


Hold on a minute ...

Are you talking about mind over matter? Are you saying consciousness somehow affects random number generators? I've heard a few parapsychologists make this claim and none of them presented convincing evidence for their theses.

I hope I haven't misconstrued your statement above but I just want to make it clear that consciousness has no effect on the physical world whatsoever other than the fact that its existence influences sentient beings to ponder over its nature.

lucidé wrote:Never said what we did was real. I just said the type of symbol matching we ended up doing sometimes ended up like that of the lottery.


Ah ... gotcha. :D
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

lucidé
Posts: 571
Joined: 04 Feb 2017 03:10

Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby lucidé » 01 Apr 2018 15:50

Summerlander wrote:
Sewing and dresses over potential oneiric creativity? That's preposterous! They did not have your interests at heart and care more about conserving image, tradition and retrograde stereotypes in order to assimilate to their generational circle of friends, I bet!

I know, but when it comes to my gender especially in Utah, feminism is a huge thing. They still make girls wear dresses on the job in Utah which I have a problem with. I really hate dresses, and unfortunately, some of my family members are a bit pushy when I wear one saying I should wear them more often. I even have family/friends that are still asking me when I’ll get married when I opened the closet to a friend I am hanging out with when he asked, and he accepted me for what I was.


Stand your ground. Stay true to who you are. Creativity from lucid dreaming is a beautiful thing. You have a gift and a lot of potential. Not many can do what you do. You will never run out of ideas because every time you have writer's (or artist's) block, you can simply have a lucid dream for more inspiration.

I never do run out of ideas. Religion gave me one of the best ideas out there, which is killing a character by lava. They just...failed to do their science in knowing that lava is a solid. Cremating acharacter alive by lava is hilarious, but a viscous volcanic eruption and the volcanic ash that races from it is a much more amusing way to kill/torture characters, as you can torture millions as opposed to just a small handful.



Hold on a minute ...

Are you talking about mind over matter? Are you saying consciousness somehow affects random number generators? I've heard a few parapsychologists make this claim and none of them presented convincing evidence for their theses.

I hope I haven't misconstrued your statement above but I just want to make it clear that consciousness has no effect on the physical world whatsoever other than the fact that its existence influences sentient beings to ponder over its nature.

I never said it did.
In real life and in lucid dreams, there exists what is called a random number generator, and this is what is responsible for some lucky incidents. Consciousness has no effect, but studying the months, days, years, and the way the universe is can affect your odds if you figure out the exact second, day, and month to perform specific actions. This is called RNG abuse. Because you have to perform the action at the exact 1/4 second, most of the time, it’s not something you can always pull off even with precise timing. There is a slight amount of skill and a luck factor on hitting that 1/4 second. It’s one of the reasons why my friends and I had to pick a precise time I figured out using RNG, as the odds of us symbol matching seemed to be way higher (was never 100%) when I figured out the exact second. If even 1 second was off, for a weird reason, I would fail to create my friends in DC form, and they would fail in their lucid dreams. Just to me, miscalculations and incorrect timing with my math, and I could always try again. It’s not like I didn’t have failures, but when I did, my friends and I never saw each others’ characters at all. Much like Einstein, I’d rather talk about the times I pulled it off, not my failures.
....Actually it was even the reason why I was even able to pull off that MILD during the medical procedure. I Calculated the odds and seconds of when I would most likely have a lucid dream, and that’s when I gave the call to the doctor to KO me.

There were a few times meshing was completely luck based, because I accidentally had it happen with another. Even with the friends a couple of times it was. The lucid dream I had during my shock was slightly luck based as I had only a 1/5 chance of that.


lucidé wrote:
Ah ... gotcha. :D


To me, if it were real, it would completely ruin the magic of lucid dreaming and multimedia. Without a reality I could call my own, I would go crazy. I know everyone has at least a small creative side and should be allowed to express it.
An example of lucid dreaming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7ps_VSPkg (1:46 Is that me or is this me? "Am I still dreaming?") Simpsons example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3X1n5Yny3g

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Vivian+
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby Vivian+ » 10 May 2018 14:32

How interesting you are talking about this.

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Summerlander
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby Summerlander » 14 May 2018 20:58

Well ... I guess we find this topic interesting. :mrgreen:
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

iby1337
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Re: Dreams aren't just happening in your brain

Postby iby1337 » 12 Jul 2018 18:59

I agree with you dreams are a different reality but a reality non the less and we travel to this "realm" while we are sleeping and who knows maybe there are more than 1 dream "realm" but yes I agree whith your OP


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