Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

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buildit
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby buildit » 21 Oct 2014 23:48

deschainXIX wrote:
Summerlander wrote:Lol! Deschain, congratulations, you're a sociopath!

A non-psycho would think she killed the sister because this one started seeing the handsome stranger. The killing would have been a crime of passion.


:mrgreen: Lol. Can't say I'm altogether surprised. Ell well. And I'm studying to become a doctor! Perhaps I should be a Medical Examiner instead. Just dealing with the corpses. :lol:


I knight thee "Dexter". :lol: Carry on :D
Is Lucid Dreaming the brains preparation for the next step of human evolution when we can escape the corporeal bond of our bodies?

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Summerlander
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby Summerlander » 21 Oct 2014 23:52

But he may look more like Chucky!! :-D

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 00:05

Summerlander wrote:Dealing with corpses? lol! That's what I plan to do at my local funeral home. I want to be an embalmer!


Yeah, those sort of pleasantly morbid jobs are interesting. I'll probably go for a Forensic Pathologist. Also called "The Detectives of Death." It's definitely the most hardcore of all medical professions, as you have to basically dissect and perform autopsies on all of the most violent and strange dead bodies on a daily basis, trying to determine which of the 5 legal death causes it is: Homicide, Suicide, Natural Causes, Accident, or Unknown. And also the various intricacies of the causes, et cetera. It sounds fun as hell! If I have the stomach for it. I've been in the operating room once before when I was 15, observing a prostate cancer surgical procedure, and I was fine with it. But Forensic Pathology is an entirely different matter, I think.

Summerlander wrote:I have so many books to read before I pick up the one I mentioned above. I am currently reading Daniel Dennett's "Consciousness Explained" where he is basically murdering dualism. You will like Hitchens, btw. Imagine Sam Harris but a bit more political. Hitchens was the Thomas Paine of our time.


Yeah, I'm definitely going to read Hitchens and Dawkins and a several others you and other people have recommended. "Consciousness Explained" sounds extremely interesting. Sam Harris briefly discussed the failure of Descartes in "The End of Faith," and I really enjoyed that.

buildit wrote:I knight thee "Dexter". Carry on


Haha, Dexter is awesome. Great show, up until the third or fourth season.
Well said.

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 00:17

Btw, I went to see the new David Fincher film, "Gone Girl," last night. Definitely the best film of the year so far. It was genius and dark and horrifying as are most of Fincher's other films (except for Alien 3 ... we don't talk about Alien 3). While the movie was mainly a vicious hyperbole for the common failures and ruin of most marriages, it was also about how you can never really know a person. You can never really see entirely inside of them, no matter how much you think you can. One mind can never really entirely understand another. It made me think about how truly easy it is for a psychopath to conceal himself/herself in a social crowd. It's impossible to discern a psychopath, if they're hidden well enough.
The really dangerous ones are the ones who are just sane enough and cunning enough to don a wholly convincing masquerade of normality and emotional presence. Not the shooters or the ones who simply go out one night with a sledgehammer and end up in a criminally-insane asylum.
I highly recommend the movie if you have nothing to do. Especially if you like dark (although the filmmaking skill displayed in "Gone Girl" was mostly attributable to the subtle and unexpected seizure upon such incredibly grotesque and mind-numbingly horrifying revelations) stories about psychopathy.
And it stars Ben Affleck! Lol.
Well said.

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 00:19

Summerlander wrote:But he may look more like Chucky!!


Actually, I'd probably prefer clown-paint. :twisted:
Well said.

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 00:59

nesgirl wrote:Good thing I am going to just hide in the bathroom when that happens (I am not @#$##ing myself when I die). Also, I am not having a funeral. Funerals suck, as they give people the excuse to cry over you, which is unnecessary. No I'll let the doctors give my parts away instead, then burn the rest of me, and use the ashes of what they burned to fertilize the plants (ashes actually make really rich plant fertilizer).


Nice! I really don't understand funerals either. Mostly because they are a religious practice. Especially if you're a Christian. Because in my experience, most Christians say, "Well, she's in heaven, dinin' with Jesus now. We'll see her again, someday." So ... I really have never understood why Christians morn at all. They should always be super happy when someone dies--because either some Godless, sinning monster is now in hell as he deserves, or a believer is in heaven as he deserves. Even back when I was a Christian, whenever I attended funerals, I just sort of looked around, a bit confused. I remember just looking at my sobbing parents and knowing they were being ignorant even of their own beliefs. :lol:

However, when I die, the world will forget me. They'll probably forget all of you, too. So I like to take minimal comfort in the fact that at least some members of my family and friends will attend my funeral and remember my existence and experiences ... at least for a little while. But then they'll die and forget. And maybe the next generations will be ruffling through old photographs in the attic or old computer records and briefly come across some remnant of my long-gone life and perhaps they'll give it a quick glance before tossing it aside and continuing the search for what they really wanted.
I think it's reasonable to attend funerals and remember people--just remember them, and think about them--for a little while. In the end, that's all you can really do for people.
Well said.

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Summerlander
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby Summerlander » 22 Oct 2014 01:29

True. I think funerals still serve a purpose. It's the opportunity to feel like you have said goodbye and you remember the deceased. It's the best we can do. It may be comforting for some to believe in the afterlife and/or a loving god but I think that doesn't have to be part of the deal. Secular people may not be able to provide much comfort but they can at least encourage the bereaved to move on after having celebrated the deceased's life. Sam Harris also recommends a great recipe for coming to terms with the nature of mind and being more accepting of who we truly are: meditation.

"Waking Up: A Guide To Spirituality Without Religion" sounds like a great book. (Already checked the first chapter on his website.) It gets you to really explore the sense of self. No need to believe in God, spirit worlds, or ghosts.

On his deathbed, Christopher Hitchens stated that the religious proposition seemed to him more absurd than ever. When asked if he ever questioned why he got esophageal cancer ("Why me?") he replied, "Why not me?" before explaining that he was just a statistic and that he simply got what his father died of - only about a decade earlier due to his lifestyle. (Although he didn't agree with his wife, he was an alcoholic.)

Christopher Hitchens remained an atheist until the end.

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 01:50

Yeah I put "Waking Up" on my to-read list after I watched this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITTxTCz4Ums

It's a great and important video, if you all have the time for it.
Indeed, I admire any total acceptance of the truth, any exercise in lucidity. It takes great bravery.
Well said.

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deschainXIX
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby deschainXIX » 22 Oct 2014 12:05

Sorry ... what? When did I say I wanted immortality?! When did I say I even believed in immortality?! Absolutely no where in my post did I even use the word "immorality." What in your little mind gave you the inkling that I was talking about the nature of immortality, dictatorships, or your anti-romantic society? You strange, strange creature. I was just trying to build on what you said... Jesus.
There is no dispute that immortality makes no sense and that it would be terrible if it did make sense. In fact, you're literally just rehashing things I've said on other threads.

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Well said.

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Summerlander
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Re: Religion and Politics: Iraqi Crisis

Postby Summerlander » 22 Oct 2014 12:27

Squidville illustrates precisely my sentiments about eternity in heaven, nesgirl. I think we agree on that point and we should be glad that it's not true. That was certainly a good speech by Sam Harris, deschainXIX. He speaks so much sense! It is a rare quality in a person. By the way, I didn't think you believed in an afterlife either. That was an odd response by nesgirl! :lol:

Belief in the afterlife can be a real problem. Take a look at Iran with its surplus of orphans as well as grieving parents and relatives, whose sons and daughters and nephews and nieces were used as cannon fodder in the eight-year war with Saddam Hussein. These people were forced to applaud the evil tactics of clergyman who promised heaven to the credulous but never cared to risk martyrdom themselves. :cry:

There was a time when Westerners could holiday in Iraq amongst Kurds and even visit Erbil and learn about its history. For example, it was there that Alexander the Great defeated the Persians. A few years ago you could fly direct from several airports in Europe to a couple of efficient airports in Iraqi Kurdistan. Now, as you know, the country is in turmoil due to the Islamic State. Business must have really gone down for these people:

http://www.theotheriraq.com/

In Kurdistan, the prime minister Nechirvan Barzani even arranged for a memorial to be built for fallen American soldiers. Despite being devided by different sects, Kurds are quite united and friendly to Christian minorities. In the past, many Arab Iraqis had fled the bedlam in Baghdad and Basra for the Kurdish safer haven. :P

If there is a people that the US government can rely on in Iraq and Syria today, it is the Kurds. It was Kurdish intelligence that first exposed the direct link between Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and Osama Bin Laden. They have bucked Saddam Hussein, al-Qaeda, and now, they face the ISIS problem. :shock:
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava


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