Is there an afterlife?

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DesertExplorer
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby DesertExplorer » 28 Feb 2015 01:18

I insist that Buddhism is not a religion. Anyway, the only thing I found is that no Buddhist believes in reincarnation. Only those who practice Hinduism believe in the concept of the soul and immortality of it, while the others in rebirth, which they explain differently.

About what you said in the previous post; Of course it's all generated by your head, but that does not make it fake or true. Just a creation.
Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it...

- Jesus Christ

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HAGART
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby HAGART » 28 Feb 2015 04:18

Well, I found my new religion.
I'm going to become a Quir.
It makes as much sense as all the others.
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

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HAGART
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby HAGART » 28 Feb 2015 04:31

A morning constitutional can become a morning confessional.
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

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Summerlander
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby Summerlander » 28 Feb 2015 10:10

Where's my link, Desert? :mrgreen:

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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DesertExplorer
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby DesertExplorer » 28 Feb 2015 13:46

http://www.sokahumanism.com/nichiren-buddhism/Differences_between_Rebirth_and_Reincarnation.html

I believe that they describe the difference pretty well here.
Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it...

- Jesus Christ

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Summerlander
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby Summerlander » 01 Mar 2015 01:46

Thanks. But that only proves my point that Buddhism is a religion. It propounds different kinds of hereafter based on karmic debt. Rebirths in other realms beyond our own, eh? Supernatural experiences in hellish and heavenly planes of existence. The Nichiren doctrine, a branch of Mahayana Buddhism, claims to know -- without evidence -- that we are more than our physical bodies and this life is not the only one for most of us. You do know the meaning of religion, right?

[ Post made via Android ] Image
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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DesertExplorer
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby DesertExplorer » 01 Mar 2015 09:44

Buddha never claimed to be a God or believe in any, neither a prophet or someone worth worshiping. Now, if so many others corrupted the teachings he provided which can turn a philosophy to a religion very easily, this is not his fault. If you can follow his way of life, I really think you won't go blind for sure. To pay attention and endorse whatever he believes about God is not necessary. It's personal anyway. When he's been asked about God, he didn't answer anything. So, it's the way to behave he taught that matters and nothing else. I think you know what I mean. Filtering what ever gets in a way of your logical mind does not mean you cannot follow. It's effective and smart. I like it. I feel agnostic in the subject of the after-life anyway and that is the good old "shield" to go in there and take what you want. You will gain something eventually, I guess.
Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it...

- Jesus Christ

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Summerlander
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby Summerlander » 01 Mar 2015 13:51

It is certainly not Siddhartha Gautama's fault and I take your valid point. There is, indeed, literature arguing that the Buddha's philosophy was corrupted over millennia (this wouldn't surprise me) and that he didn't even require people to follow him as he asserted that people could find their own way on their own. He was a philosopher at heart, agnostic and curious about reality, a meditator, and, like any other human being, he was right about some things and wrong about others. He was, in my opinion, certainly wrong about karma. He had charisma and was a highly influential individual, which is why Buddhism spread and survived this long. It is certainly better than the monotheisms.

[ Post made via Android ] Image
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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DesertExplorer
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby DesertExplorer » 28 Apr 2015 00:09

I don't know why this slipped my attention. Well, what do you think that Buddha believed and meant about and with the word "Karma"?
Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it...

- Jesus Christ

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Summerlander
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Re: Is there an afterlife?

Postby Summerlander » 28 Apr 2015 02:30

I think Gautama's most profound discovery was that there is an alternative to the hedonistic path as a means to achieve happiness. This alternative became clear to him when he realised, via meditation, that the self -- or ego -- is an illusion, and that desire is a form of attachment that leads to suffering.

So the Buddha teaches us to introspect, to observe conscious experience without bias, to try to look at the world without the goggles of LIKE and DISLIKE. His valuable lesson can be illustrated with the following analogy: He is like the adult reminding the child that the movie is an illusion and that one needn't become too absorbed. He gets our attention to the fact that the movie is really merely a projection of light and sounds and there is no objective meaning other than cause and effect. Once you can do this you are free in a sense.

Thoughts -- insofar as they arise and appear to trigger emotions and behaviours -- no longer dictate. They are merely observed in meditation. They suddenly appear as just objects of consciousness and the self no longer needs to be defended whatever the cost. The self -- as a supernatural observer hiding behind physical eyes -- does not exist. You can observe yourself thinking and then focus away from concepts to realise that a pristine awareness exists, a mind unclouded by thoughts and judgement free. Once you attain this perspective, however briefly, it becomes easier to be more accepting of that which you cannot control in your normal state and day-to-day life.

Now, karma is not the Newtonian cause-and-effect. Karma -- according to many modern Buddhists -- appears to be a force that either rewards or punishes individuals for what they have done before. If the Buddha thought this is how reality works, like a judgemental "boomerang," he was wrong.

Like I said before, he was just a man. He might have achieved enlightenment, as they say, and perhaps this is the best way to lead a life free of affliction if our perspective is radically altered to that extent, but enlightenment does not equate with omniscience. A profound sense of self-transcendence does not bestow you the knowledge of Einstein or an emulation of Richard Feynman's understanding of quantum mechanics.

The Buddha was venially unaware of such things as science hadn't even taken off at that time. But he was certainly curious and inquisitive about reality -- qualities worthy of a true scientist.

[ Post made via Android ] Image
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava


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