How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

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HAGART
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How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby HAGART » 04 Mar 2012 04:14

I read a lot on this site. Rebbecca admits that False Awakenings are very common for her and others have stated that it is so common that they always do a reality check when they wake up.

I do the same. Every time I lucid dream and it fades and I wake up.... It is almost always a false awakening. Which is good, because I can continue the lucid dream from there.

But I wonder why? Why can't a lucid dream last for a long time (usually 15 minutes is max for me) before I feel the need to 'wake up'. And then don't! It's probably a mental block on my part, but it also seems to be quite common among us.

It's all part of the territory of lucid dreaming I always thought... but maybe I just need more control?

(Then again, most regular dreams that I recall tend to change settings every 15 minutes or so and quite abruptly. But I never notice until I write it down. Maybe dreams need to change after a while, and if you are still lucid you become lucid in the construct of your own bedroom.)
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

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Peter
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby Peter » 04 Mar 2012 07:11

If I have a run of LD over 2 or 3 nights I will have a FA or 2. They are not that regular for me and dont have to happen.
Who are you I asked, the reply "dont be silly, we are your daughers" many years before they were born

KylePK
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby KylePK » 04 Mar 2012 07:44

I don't know if I've ever had a false awakening, but sometimes after a WILD attempt or just meditating into a lucid dream attempt, I feel very strange when I open my eyes. RC's all pass, but I still feel weird. Dunno.
Striving to live free and enlightened in every way.

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Gooeymaw
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby Gooeymaw » 04 Mar 2012 23:24

I used to have them ALL THE TIME, like nearly every morning, but I don't remember the last time I had a false awakening. Not in the last 20 odd years.

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lucidinthe sky
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby lucidinthe sky » 05 Mar 2012 04:09

I had my first false awakening two lucid dreams ago, but fortunately I did an RC and didn't miss a beat. I went right into lucid dream Part 2 without actually waking up.

I'm thinking it might be a good idea to always do an RC after waking up if this happens to you often. So far for me it's only been once.
Have you ever had a dream, Neo, that you were so sure was real? What if you were unable to wake from that dream? How would you know the difference between the dream world and the real world? Morpheus

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HAGART
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby HAGART » 05 Mar 2012 05:33

False awakenings happen to me all the time.
I just picture it as part of the territory of lucid dreamng,,,,,,,
BUT IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE......DOES IT?
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

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Summerlander
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby Summerlander » 05 Mar 2012 20:44

In answer to that, false awakenings are actually in lucid dreaming territory. They are shown to be part of phase states of the brain on EEG. Let me explain this better. The phase is a hybrid state between wakefulness and dreaming. The cerebral activity indicative of this state is observable when people experience what they call OOBEs, astral projection, lucid dreaming and false awakenings.

A person can be in the phase and believe that things are really happening in waking life (like in the case of some alien abductions). A person can be in the phase and not know that they are in such a state of consciousness. You might say: but doesn't that happen in non-lucid dreams already?

Yes, it does. But there is a fundamental difference. In the phase, you are mindful. You have the power of logic and analysis. Those qualities are operational as they are in wakefulness, and yet, what you experience is not physical reality. It is not like a mindless dream where you may be chased by a dragon and completely believe it is really happening. No. In the phase, you notice the anomalies. You are able to make logical assessments. In the phase, you are lucid. You can lucidly explore the dream world. The "drunkenness" of mere dreaming is absent. In lucid dreams, you can have waking life memory.

So, how are false awakenings lucid dreaming? FAs are lucid dreaming without knowing that you are lucid dreaming. That's why they don't seem to last long, because, in your mindful state, you quickly realise that there is something wrong as you discover anomalies in the environment. It is all about those "aha" moments. You are LUCID even if you don't know, at first, whether what you are perceiving is reality, dream or hallucination.

Take a look at this as it shows the reason why the "phase" term in Michael Raduga's site has been introduced:

http://research.obe4u.com/about-the-phase/
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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HAGART
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby HAGART » 05 Mar 2012 21:59

Yea, sometimes I think false awakenings are real.
But now I am always lucid during a false awakening because they occur so often.

And FA's have something to do with how conscious you are of reality.
Summerlander wrote:The cerebral activity indicative of this state is observable when people experience what they call OOBEs, astral projection, lucid dreaming and false awakenings.
I agree, they are all lucid dreams. The only difference is how you experience it and how you feel. Your sense of self. In a dream we are just an entity without a form but in a false awakening or a OOBE, we feel like we have a body. They are all lucid dreams.

Sometimes when I have a false awakening I feel like I am sleep walking. I know I am asleep and things look different, but I feel like I am literally walking around my house. I try to write messages on paper for me to find after I truly wake up, but of course they are non-existent because it was just a dream. BUT it felt so real when it was happening.

I don't mind false awakenings, but apparently it is not common among us as I once thought.
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.

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James
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby James » 06 Mar 2012 16:27

I have only had 2 recallable FA =/
Was it worth it?

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Summerlander
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Re: How Common Are False Awakenings For You All?

Postby Summerlander » 08 Mar 2012 21:48

Indeed it is all lucid dreaming. More eloquently put, you might want to take a look at this link and here is a quote I have provided from the Lucidity Institute:

"During a WILD, or sleep paralysis, the awake and alert mind keeps up its good work of showing us the world it expects is out there -- although it can no longer sense it. So, then we are in a mental-dream-world. Possibly we feel the cessation of the sensation of gravity as that part of sensory input shuts down, and then feel that we are suddenly lighter and float up, rising from the place where we know our real body to be lying still. The room around us looks about the same, because that is our brain's best guess about where we are. If we did not know that we had just fallen asleep, we might well think that we were awake, still in touch with the physical world, and that something mighty strange was happening -- a departure of the mind from the physical body! The unusual feeling of leaving the body is exciting and alarming. This, combined with the realistic imagery of the bedroom is enough to account for the conviction of many OBE experients' that "it was too real to be a dream." Dreams, too, can be astonishingly real, especially if you are attending to their realness. Usually, we pass through our dreams without thinking much about them, and upon awakening remember little of them. Hence, they seem "unreal." But waking life is also like that -- our memory for a typical, mundane day is flat and lacking in detail. It is only the novel, exciting, or frightening events that leave vivid impressions. If we stop what we are doing, we can look around and say, "Yes, this world looks solid and real." But, if you look back and try to recall, for instance, brushing
your teeth this morning, your memory is likely to be vague and not very life-like. Contrast this to a past event that excited or alarmed you, which is likely to seem much more "real" in retrospect.

Lucid dreamers often comment to themselves in dreams, "I know this is a dream, but it all seems so incredibly real!" All this goes to show that the feeling that an event is real does not mean that it is happening in the physical world that we all share when we are awake. This is not to deny that that inner experiences are real, in that they have deeply profound effects on our lives. However, as lucid dreaming so amply demonstrates, we can learn to distinguish between our personal dreams and events in the consensus dream we call physical reality. When we do, we find that what we thought was one thing -- the waking world -- is actually another -- a dream.

Proof that some or even most OBEs are dreams is not enough to allow us to say that a genuine OBE is impossible. However, in the interests of lucidity, if you have an OBE, why not test to see if the OBE-world passes the reality test? Is the room you are in the one you are actually sleeping in? If you have left your body, where is it? Do things change when you are not looking at them (or when you are)? Can you read something twice and have it remain the same on both readings? If any of your questions and investigations leave you doubting that you are in the physical world, is it not logical to believe you are dreaming?

Another point to consider is that a dream doesn't always have to happen in REM sleep. Most do, but there are probably quite a few other conditions in which people can lose touch with sensory experience and enter a mental world. Some such states that we know of are hypnotic trance, anesthesia, and sensory isolation. OBEs have been reported from these states (Nash et al., 1984; Olson, 1988). Thus, the argument that an OBE cannot be a dream because the experient wasn't asleep doesn't hold water."


http://www.lucidity.com/NL32.OBEandLD.html

Their suspicions that OOBEs and lucid dreams are the same are justified. And the link is fairly old. Further work has been done. I work closely with Michael Raduga in giving experiments (assignments) for many practitioners of the phase state (OOBEs and lucid dreaming). I also have my own experiences and have studied and verified many techniques taught at the School of Out-of-Body Travel in practice. Reported experiences are very consistent. It is all lucid dreaming... of this I haven't the slightest shadow of a doubt.
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava


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