Does reality check really works for everyone?

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Viator
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Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby Viator » 04 Mar 2015 21:49

I know that this is a technique widely used, but I’ve been wondering if it really works, at least if it works for everyone.
I had a dream once in which I try push my hand through stairs but I was already aware that I was dreaming so I believe I reached lucidity spontaneously, in the first time I didn’t succeed, in the second neither then I thought with myself “wait, I’m pretty sure this is a dream my hand was supposed to go through this it is supposed to go through” then I strongly believed that I would push my hand through the stairs and finally I succeeded. I had also a dream before this one
where I’m in doubt if I’m dreaming or not and then I try to push my hand through a wall and I don’t succeed I try it over and over again and don’t succeed.

So here is my question: Wouldn’t only after I’m already lucid that I would succeed pushing my hand through a wall? If I’m right about this then reality check is useless.
Doesn’t what we do in reality repeats in our dreams? In reality my hand is obviously not gonna go through a wall so in the dream it won’t neither, what will really make me lucid is spontaneous lucidity.

I’m not sure if dream signs work for me neither because once I’m in a dream anything that happens is completely normal. There is nothing odd about taking a mattress out of a drawer. My reasoning and thoughts are all different.

Maybe all of this has to do with the fact that I suffer from maladaptive daydreaming disorder. Not sure.

Triad
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby Triad » 04 Mar 2015 22:16

Always do multiple reality checks. Once I pushed my hand through a wall but didn't work, so as my 2nd reality check I pinched my nose and tried to tried from my nose, and I realized I was able to breathe with my nose. It's the reality check with highest success ratio I think. Have at least 3 reality checks. I use counting fingers, breathing with pinched nose and pushing my hand through solid surface as my reality checks. I hope it's helpfull. :)

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taniaaust1
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby taniaaust1 » 07 Mar 2015 11:45

Doesn’t what we do in reality repeats in our dreams? In reality my hand is obviously not gonna go through a wall so in the dream it won’t neither


That thought you have there would make reality checks likely to fail. What we think when dreaming we often then create, so if you believe dreams are like reality and that you won't be able to push hand through a wall, you probably wont be able to do it. When doing a reality check, you need to really believe you may get an odd response.

Reality doesn't at all have to repeat in our dreams. I like yourself though do have very real like dreams with rarely strange stuff in my LDs, it's very like reality. That though doesn't make it impossible to see or create something strange with a reality check.

Also if you are already aware you are dreaming, I suggest to not reality check as when we do that when already aware, its like sending a message to the subconciousness that "maybe this isn't a dream after all".. and that then can cause a reality check failure which can then make the person doubt.

If you haven't done already .. the next time you need to do a check (if not spontaneously aware you are dreaming) try looking at your hand and thinking" in dreams hands often appear strange. "

Reality checks like trying to fly or holding my nose and trying to breath fail me but I find staring at my hand always works and it will be very weird eg extra fingers, split hand (as in the painting I did of this by my nic) or even having plants growing from my fingers.
The only thing to fear is the fear itself

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Viator
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby Viator » 12 Mar 2015 16:17

It’s hard to keep myself from becoming skeptical about succeeding in pushing my hand through a wall since I do it so many times in reality and don’t succeed. The same of course with any other reality check.

I read a post from Rebecca she says that no technique works for everyone, maybe this one really doesn’t work for me. I read it long ago when I was trying lucid dreaming for the first time, I needed to be reminded it was a long time ago, but I should have thought about it without even have to read it. Everyone seems to use and talk about this technique so much that I didn’t even think about the uniqueness of each person. I’m even a little embarrassed now.

Thank you both for the answers, but I think I’m leaving reality check aside and trying something else.

I think even if my hands appear strange in a dream I won’t notice it. Nothing seems strange to me in dreams.

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taniaaust1
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby taniaaust1 » 13 Mar 2015 08:02

Viator wrote:
I think even if my hands appear strange in a dream I won’t notice it. Nothing seems strange to me in dreams.


If that is the case you need to be working on teaching yourself to be questioning your surroundings, so that you are more aware.
The only thing to fear is the fear itself

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Viator
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby Viator » 18 Mar 2015 15:53

taniaaust1 wrote:
Viator wrote:
I think even if my hands appear strange in a dream I won’t notice it. Nothing seems strange to me in dreams.


If that is the case you need to be working on teaching yourself to be questioning your surroundings, so that you are more aware.


I had some problem with that too but I think I should keep trying to do it.

astrovineyard
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby astrovineyard » 18 Mar 2015 16:59

The obvious and simple answer to your question is: "No."

The problems leading to failure are more numerous (I imagine) than those leading to success:

1. SLEEPING or SLEEPING PROPERLY that you can dream or realize/remember them.

2. HAVING MOMENTS in dreams that are opportunities to be lucid (whether a regular dream or a sleep paralysis state),

3. REMEMBERING that you have to do a reality check,

4. Knowing HOW to do a reality check,

5. SUCCEEDING when you do a reality check (to become lucid),

6. Either MAINTAINING lucidity once achieved (by not waking up or relapsing into non-lucid dreaming) or AVOIDING negative/prolonged/frightening sleep paralysis/hypnagogic hallucinations (where you then panic to struggle to break the paralysis and/or wake up, AND...

7. Somehow manage, while pursuing various techniques to achieve said lucidity, to avoid unintentional side effects (like INSOMNIA) which themselves prevent success, and then need to be dealt with separately AND avoided the next time you try.

So, despite what people say, there is a genius/luck aspect to all of this. Some people are lucky and fall into it accidentally while others are disciplined enough to achieve it intentionally with no negative side effects. But it is as unreasonable as someone claiming because THEY are a millionaire that YOU CAN BE DO by doing what they did, to claim that it is easy or achievable for everyone, and honestly stating that would be a good start to avoiding a lot of stress and disappointment, making people feel that there is something wrong with THEM or that they didn't try HARD ENOUGH.

(I encounter similar situations that require empathy in other forums like on SP where people are plagued by them, think there is really some evil, and want to be rid of their chronic condition. Our opinions may differ on the existence of external supernatural agents responsible for their condition, but even in the arena of giving advice to avoid/prevent/or escape SP vary, such that my assurances that "well, I managed to conquer SP when I was just a little kid and didn't even know what it was called, so YOU CAN TOO!" doesn't help if you are an adult suffering from chronic or consecutive, long, terrifying episodes of sleep paralysis. My relative "ease" of being rid of it will only frustrate them who simply cannot do the same when they are older, stronger and wiser. Likewise, I am finding it equally or AS difficult to RETURN to a place in my life where I can experience AP again! Apparently it IS very difficult to induce or prevent SP, or perceive it as not terrifying and a useful portal to other experiences like LD.)

And, if the endeavor is as noble as claimed, and truly wants people to succeed, then they should warn against side effects, how to prevent them, and how to fix them if you get stuck. Any drug would post warnings about side effects and treatment, so why not this?

astrovineyard
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby astrovineyard » 18 Mar 2015 17:05

Despite the length of the previous post, I forgot to mention that, in my case, the adverse side effects (insomnia) of attempting lucidity have been FAR worse than any food or drug allergy or negative reaction, including alcohol, OTC meds or prescriptions. The experience of insomnia is far more troubling and real to me than any drug side effects, and those effects are compounded the next day in how I feel (awful) the whole day and am rendered ineffective at work and, frankly, a hazard while driving to and from work. So, I think this should be taken seriously. Not "litigation required" necessary, but simply as a responsible measure to recognize that things like this can occur and tips to avoid or help cure things like this would be very useful and appreciated. Or, at least, make people think twice before they attempt it, if they truly are ultimately responsible for what and if anything happens to them as a consequence.

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taniaaust1
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby taniaaust1 » 20 Mar 2015 04:28

astrovineyard wrote:And, if the endeavor is as noble as claimed, and truly wants people to succeed, then they should warn against side effects, how to prevent them, and how to fix them if you get stuck. Any drug would post warnings about side effects and treatment, so why not this?


Its impossible to warn about every little thing which can go wrong with LD even the drug warnings of cause don't list every thing which can go wrong. They only list the top issues a person could have. LD isn't as dangerous as drugs either, the worst 99%+ people can do is end up giving themselves nightmares, anxiety over sleep or insomnia.

It's up to people whenever learning any new thing to find out what they can first, you cant expect people freely to advise about anything and everything which could go wrong... .impossible. It's like if someone wants to go bushwalking, they cant blame others for not telling them about every little thing which could happen while out bushwalking!!! Its up to people to research and even then of cause something unforeseen could happen along the walk. It's life, its never entirely predictable but that doesn't mean we should fear everything.

Often too beginners may not want to listen to good advice or they try to get their advice from other noobs to it and then wonder why something went wrong. (Lots of beginners love giving advice to other beginners, there is nothing wrong with them doing this but of cause there is a high change they could be saying something which isn't correct).



2. HAVING MOMENTS in dreams that are opportunities to be lucid (whether a regular dream or a sleep paralysis state),


Reality checks don't at all go with SP so I dont know why you brought up SP when it comes to reality checking. When one is in SP it is extremely hard to do reality checking after all how many of the reality checks usually can one do in a SP paralysed state eg You cant count fingers as you cant hold them up to do so and cant move them, you cant look at at a clock to recheck as you cant roll over to see one, you cant hold your nose and try to breath as you cant move your hand etc etc.

SP isn't conductive to reality checking. It's another reason why SP states can be a hinderance to have a LD. You cant reality check well during one to find out you are dreaming and you can be missing your LD by thinking you are just in sleep paralyses when you are having actually having a dream while quite conscious and even not realising you are. (I saw a post where someone had done just that in only the past 24 hrs so missed having a LD cause of SP).

2. HAVING MOMENTS in dreams that are opportunities to be lucid (whether a regular dream or a sleep paralysis state),


That's the whole idea of programming oneself to do reality checking and also doing awareness exercises.. to create more of those moments.
The only thing to fear is the fear itself

astrovineyard
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Re: Does reality check really works for everyone?

Postby astrovineyard » 20 Mar 2015 12:48

I'm sorry to disagree, but I can always find LONG lists of side effects of medication, usually broken down into usual and rarer categories, most of which I DON'T experience. How long can the side effects of attempting to LD be? And how rare is it that I am experiencing insomnia as a result (to the point I finally had to see a doctor about it and get prescription meds.) Oh, look, did you or someone just shake his or her head in shame at me for having "resorted" to this?

And stop calling me a "beginner." I used to have SP when I was a kid and was able to rid myself of it with help from no-one, not even knowing what it was. So there I was as a preteen with the will and discipline to master what many adults with SP yearn to control. I am 43 now and in the intervening decades have experimented with lucidity every several years. Whether counting as when I first tried it some 25 years ago or just adding up the times I did, giving me probably several months of combined effort (most of it before the use of internet to help!), in what sense am I a beginner? A failed veteran, perhaps.

What I object to in reading success stories and tips is that, not only do they fail to mention ANY side effects (except MAYBE a SCARY DREAM - ooooooooh!), but they basically GUARANTEE that THEIR method will work. Even the main page of this very site has articles (by newbies? I think not!) that say things like "you can fall asleep in ONE SECOND" (making me feel an idiot loser that after a few thousand seconds I am still awake) or easy steps to become lucid. No matter what I try: Insomnia.

It seems that I cannot have my cake and eat it too. By that I mean: lose the insomnia (regaining good sleep) AND having lucid dreams. I must pick one or the other. And since I can apparently live without LD but not sleep, I guess the choice is made for me. I am trying hard not to accept this since I am so drawn to this based on the power of my past experiences (that makes it worse, knowing that I once COULD do it and "had it"). But I guess I really need to stop going for lucidity and the best I can hope for is to join the throngs of millions of clueless "zombies" who "just sleep" through their dreams, unaware of the potential you guys have discovered.

____

Reality Checks: I mention that because in my experience, dreams that BECOME SP begin with very vivid moments that are great opportunities to become lucid (like looking into a mirror) but I fail to take advantage of. But, I have read and actually say a multi-part video series on having lucid dreams where they actually tell you how to turn SP into an opportunity to LD. They make it seem part of the process. You seem hung up on my association of SP and LD. I don't mind or fear the connection, and my frustration is that I can't arrive at EITHER state, whether I'll be able to take advantage of it when I get there! So many intervening "steps" to master, and yet I am advised "not to think TOO HARD about it." Yea, right.


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