HELLO

Drop a line here to introduce yourself! Let us know your background, where you're from in the world, your lucid goals.
somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

HELLO

Postby somfar » 12 Apr 2015 05:41

Just want to introduce myself in proper fashion. Name is Keith and I am 55 years young and gettn younger as the days pass. Feel as though I am an ancient soul trapped in this present form,day and time. The thought and reality of lucid dreams is very real to me, have had them already and been bitten and liked it.....VERY MUCH SO !. I want more and want to discover how to have this experience every night. I understand that the mind is incredible and the only limits to it are the ones forced upon us thru fear and ignorane, limitations I seek to shed. The mind controls the body...but who...or what controls our mind..... better yet who's mind is it? All action begins with a thought and thought comes from our mind, a mind that we have been taught is devided into the concious and subconcious, but somehow in our dreams the two become one and overlap. Lucid dreaming is a very real....very serious study in understanding the true nature of ourselves, one that I look forward to learning more about. Any help that I can gain on that path would be greatly appreciated. Peaceful journeys fellow dreamers.

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son of shennong
Posts: 44
Joined: 07 Apr 2015 16:44

Re: HELLO

Postby son of shennong » 12 Apr 2015 20:30

สวัสดีครับ Keith;
I'm sure you'll make quick progress towards whatever goals you're setting for yourself w LDs.
Do u remember any of the dreams you had as a child? Say, b4 you were 8 yrs old?
“Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in."
Thoreau

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Summerlander
Posts: 4196
Joined: 22 Sep 2011 19:52

Re: HELLO

Postby Summerlander » 13 Apr 2015 01:14

The mind does not control the body. On the contrary...

Some people can't help but be depressed and need medication. Low levels of serotonin can affect brain activity and will ultimately influence your mind. You don't pick your urges and your emotions. If you did, you'd be able to choose to be happy--ecstatic, even--all the time. This is not possible. It is precisely the other way around: cells beget your state of mind. Physicalism as opposed to the existential absurdity you espoused.

There is no downward spiral. (This is an illusion.) People claim to improve themselves through meditation and yes, it is true that meditation is good for you--neuroscience surely reveals that it is beneficial to the brain--but do not make the mistake of thinking that you chose to take up meditation out of free will or that you manipulated the firing of neurons. For starters, there is no free will. There is will but it is not free. Influence is indeed the key here. Your environment, what happens to you, what you come across in life, how your organism reacts to such exposures determines what you will feel and ultimately think. Believe it or not, but scientific experiments, such as Libet's, demonstrate that decision-making happens in unconsciousness, meaning, the relevant brain activity starts before the subject becomes aware of making a decision.

One does not pick one's genome, family, upbringing, and the people one encounters in one's lifetime. Some people are depressed and have the urge to drink alcohol sinking further into depression. They succumbed to such urge because it is stronger than the urge to get better in their brains. The brain is so complex and haphazard in nature that it begets a mind in conflict. The individual has no hand in picking the winning urges and final thoughts... they just arise! Your urge to lucid dream, meditate, change diet and lifestyle (making you feel young) won out, it was stronger in your brain--and you were obviously exposed to beneficial "therapies" (saving you from a midlife crisis) that happened to resonate with you. I used to smoke. I quit eight years ago. Some people say I had "will power." But I contend that I was not really the author of the choice to quit. I just happened upon the right brain state. Why did I not succeed in quitting before the day when I finally succeeded? I couldn't because my brain wasn't ready. Matter is at the root of mental phenomenon. Where is free will in all of this? It is an illusion.

Oh, one more thing... Anyone who meditates will realise that the mind is noisy and many thoughts compete for the spotlight that is consciousness. These thoughts just arise. You do not pick them. Even when you think you are going against the tide of upward causation, and you try your might to focus on one particular thing, this decision had already arisen in the depths of the unconscious before you even became aware of it. Consciousness is not the author of anything, it is merely the witness. You don't even need a lab to observe this. When you touch a hot pan your hand quickly recoils in a reflex and there was no time to think. Afterwards you notice how it just happened. Consciousness is an illusion, too. When I say illusion, I am not saying that something doesn't exist. I am saying that it is not what it seems. Consciousness is like a centre of gravity--the Earth appears to have one--but, in this analogy, we must remember that there were no "centres of gravity" prior to planet formation. No magnetic points attracting dust in space. Particles of dust attracted one another. Consciousness is also analogous to the "wetness" of water. I can assure you that hydrogen and oxygen atoms, that make up the water molecule, are not wet!

Finally, consciousness is like a supermarket claiming authorship of fairtrade products imported from abroad. It brands these products harvested in unconscious land with its own logo. The self, or ego, the supposed "king" or "dictator" straight out of an Orwellian novel, selfishly takes the credit.

Some say no free will destroys the self-help industry. I disagree. Why would acknowledging free will as a mere illusion throw out the entire self-help industry? I'm not advocating fatalism here. From our perspective it seems that we are in control of many things and there is great utility in this. We have all made mistakes in the past, and at present we have the memory of those mistakes--something we couldn't possibly have before--which bestows us with an informed brain state urging us to avoid the same blunders. Hence, "I wish I had done this..." but at the time you couldn't because your physiology did not permit you to do so. Anyway, people should still be encouraged to better themselves. Improvement should still be sought because it is a viable option, a goal worth tackling. You might say, "If there is no free will, why bother to do anything at all? Why not just remain still and wait for things to happen?" But realise that even this would be a choice, and not just a defeatist one, but a hard one to make, too. (And remember: this choice would arise from physical mechanisms that you didn't author either.) You can decide what you decide but you cannot decide what you will decide. Hence no free will. Try to remain stationary forever and you will soon be faced with great challenges leading you to a tortured mental state. Tedium, hunger, thirst, and fatigue would soon blight you: your body urging you to move. The ego does not, naturally, like to acknowledge its enslaved state, so it pretends to be the author and deludes itself to be the master in control. I'll reiterate for emphasis: there is no such thing as free will. If you think about it, you will realise that the concept is absurd.

If you say what would be the point of embracing the idea you are inadvertently implying that there is no point in acknowledging certain truths. I don't know about you, but, I prefer cold-hearted truths to comfortable lies or delusions. Anyway, the idea isn't as bad as you might think. It means that we remind ourselves that anti-social disorders are not qualities that those afflicted with them pick for themselves. You don't pick the hand you are given. Yes, this does indeed destroy notions of culpability and praise when we observe that we do not author what drives us. Imagine a future utopia where our descendants look back at us and deem our judicial system to be barbaric with its punishment methodology. What sense does it make to penalise individuals who were given unfortunate hands in the game of life? Imagine a future where psychopathy is treatable like any other illness, or eradicable by genetic engineering! At the moment, criminal minds are incarcerated, and in a way it is the only efficient deterrent we have for their sake and the rest of society's. But we shouldn't forget that if we traded places with them, and thus possessed the same chemical make-up, we would behave exactly the same way. We would be them! Depressing is the idea that we vindictively punish the unfortunate instead of tackling the root-cause of their incompatibility with society. In a deterministic universe--a world of cause-and-effect--free will makes no sense.

Acknowledging that there is no free will should also help people to focus on the present moment and extinguish regret as they realise they couldn't have possibly behaved any other way in the past. ;-)

I am turning into nesgirl. :-D

[ Post made via Android ] Image
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

Re: HELLO

Postby somfar » 19 Apr 2015 04:38

son of shennong wrote:สวัสดีครับ Keith;
I'm sure you'll make quick progress towards whatever goals you're setting for yourself w LDs.
Do u remember any of the dreams you had as a child? Say, b4 you were 8 yrs old?


shennong

Good day and thanx for responding. Most of my dreams as a child would be best described as....nightmares, dreams controlled by fear imbedded in my mind and life by ignorance of those around me who were to be my teachers. Lucid dreaming gives us the opportunity to go back and not only face those fears but overcome them with a new mind set. I honestly believe that our minds decide our outcome in life and we are responsible to feed them well and often. I think everyone here is trying to do just that.....feed their mind with as much information as possible about a very.....REAL experience that we have all had and want to continue to have. No one likes to feel like they are not in control of their lives, be it awake...or asleep.

Sweet and Peaceful Journeys..in your dreams !

somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

Re: HELLO

Postby somfar » 19 Apr 2015 04:52

Summerlander wrote:The mind does not control the body. On the contrary...

Some people can't help but be depressed and need medication. Low levels of serotonin can affect brain activity and will ultimately influence your mind. You don't pick your urges and your emotions. If you did, you'd be able to choose to be happy--ecstatic, even--all the time. This is not possible. It is precisely the other way around: cells beget your state of mind. Physicalism as opposed to the existential absurdity you espoused.

There is no downward spiral. (This is an illusion.) People claim to improve themselves through meditation and yes, it is true that meditation is good for you--neuroscience surely reveals that it is beneficial to the brain--but do not make the mistake of thinking that you chose to take up meditation out of free will or that you manipulated the firing of neurons. For starters, there is no free will. There is will but it is not free. Influence is indeed the key here. Your environment, what happens to you, what you come across in life, how your organism reacts to such exposures determines what you will feel and ultimately think. Believe it or not, but scientific experiments, such as Libet's, demonstrate that decision-making happens in unconsciousness, meaning, the relevant brain activity starts before the subject becomes aware of making a decision.

One does not pick one's genome, family, upbringing, and the people one encounters in one's lifetime. Some people are depressed and have the urge to drink alcohol sinking further into depression. They succumbed to such urge because it is stronger than the urge to get better in their brains. The brain is so complex and haphazard in nature that it begets a mind in conflict. The individual has no hand in picking the winning urges and final thoughts... they just arise! Your urge to lucid dream, meditate, change diet and lifestyle (making you feel young) won out, it was stronger in your brain--and you were obviously exposed to beneficial "therapies" (saving you from a midlife crisis) that happened to resonate with you. I used to smoke. I quit eight years ago. Some people say I had "will power." But I contend that I was not really the author of the choice to quit. I just happened upon the right brain state. Why did I not succeed in quitting before the day when I finally succeeded? I couldn't because my brain wasn't ready. Matter is at the root of mental phenomenon. Where is free will in all of this? It is an illusion.

Oh, one more thing... Anyone who meditates will realise that the mind is noisy and many thoughts compete for the spotlight that is consciousness. These thoughts just arise. You do not pick them. Even when you think you are going against the tide of upward causation, and you try your might to focus on one particular thing, this decision had already arisen in the depths of the unconscious before you even became aware of it. Consciousness is not the author of anything, it is merely the witness. You don't even need a lab to observe this. When you touch a hot pan your hand quickly recoils in a reflex and there was no time to think. Afterwards you notice how it just happened. Consciousness is an illusion, too. When I say illusion, I am not saying that something doesn't exist. I am saying that it is not what it seems. Consciousness is like a centre of gravity--the Earth appears to have one--but, in this analogy, we must remember that there were no "centres of gravity" prior to planet formation. No magnetic points attracting dust in space. Particles of dust attracted one another. Consciousness is also analogous to the "wetness" of water. I can assure you that hydrogen and oxygen atoms, that make up the water molecule, are not wet!

Finally, consciousness is like a supermarket claiming authorship of fairtrade products imported from abroad. It brands these products harvested in unconscious land with its own logo. The self, or ego, the supposed "king" or "dictator" straight out of an Orwellian novel, selfishly takes the credit.

Some say no free will destroys the self-help industry. I disagree. Why would acknowledging free will as a mere illusion throw out the entire self-help industry? I'm not advocating fatalism here. From our perspective it seems that we are in control of many things and there is great utility in this. We have all made mistakes in the past, and at present we have the memory of those mistakes--something we couldn't possibly have before--which bestows us with an informed brain state urging us to avoid the same blunders. Hence, "I wish I had done this..." but at the time you couldn't because your physiology did not permit you to do so. Anyway, people should still be encouraged to better themselves. Improvement should still be sought because it is a viable option, a goal worth tackling. You might say, "If there is no free will, why bother to do anything at all? Why not just remain still and wait for things to happen?" But realise that even this would be a choice, and not just a defeatist one, but a hard one to make, too. (And remember: this choice would arise from physical mechanisms that you didn't author either.) You can decide what you decide but you cannot decide what you will decide. Hence no free will. Try to remain stationary forever and you will soon be faced with great challenges leading you to a tortured mental state. Tedium, hunger, thirst, and fatigue would soon blight you: your body urging you to move. The ego does not, naturally, like to acknowledge its enslaved state, so it pretends to be the author and deludes itself to be the master in control. I'll reiterate for emphasis: there is no such thing as free will. If you think about it, you will realise that the concept is absurd.

If you say what would be the point of embracing the idea you are inadvertently implying that there is no point in acknowledging certain truths. I don't know about you, but, I prefer cold-hearted truths to comfortable lies or delusions. Anyway, the idea isn't as bad as you might think. It means that we remind ourselves that anti-social disorders are not qualities that those afflicted with them pick for themselves. You don't pick the hand you are given. Yes, this does indeed destroy notions of culpability and praise when we observe that we do not author what drives us. Imagine a future utopia where our descendants look back at us and deem our judicial system to be barbaric with its punishment methodology. What sense does it make to penalise individuals who were given unfortunate hands in the game of life? Imagine a future where psychopathy is treatable like any other illness, or eradicable by genetic engineering! At the moment, criminal minds are incarcerated, and in a way it is the only efficient deterrent we have for their sake and the rest of society's. But we shouldn't forget that if we traded places with them, and thus possessed the same chemical make-up, we would behave exactly the same way. We would be them! Depressing is the idea that we vindictively punish the unfortunate instead of tackling the root-cause of their incompatibility with society. In a deterministic universe--a world of cause-and-effect--free will makes no sense.

Acknowledging that there is no free will should also help people to focus on the present moment and extinguish regret as they realise they couldn't have possibly behaved any other way in the past. ;-)

I am turning into nesgirl. :-D

[ Post made via Android ] Image



SERIOUSLY....WTF ?.....all that from a simple hello. "The mind does not control the body." you're words not mine. Proof in point....remove the brain from the shell and the body will rot...in hell. You're body can't function without your brain...which by the way ....contains your mind. I am sorry but your little rant is falling on deaf ears and most of what you are ranting about is complete BS. Just my opinion. Don't use my post to push your propaganda.

User avatar
son of shennong
Posts: 44
Joined: 07 Apr 2015 16:44

Re: HELLO

Postby son of shennong » 19 Apr 2015 05:05

Cool that you remember your childhood dreams.
I think it's important to remember that fear is an emotional state, in fact, just one of many. Behind all of our emotions is our awareness, which is more of a constant, altho the degree of our awareness naturally ebbs & flows over time in concert w our energy & mental power Dwelling more in awareness, letting your emotional states come and go, recognizing them for what they are but realizing you are more than just an emotional state, may help center you more to the point where LD's become easier for you. Do you meditate or do any sadhana? I find that actively working on building awareness complements dream experience awareness.
“Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in."
Thoreau

somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

Re: HELLO

Postby somfar » 19 Apr 2015 05:18

Summerlander wrote:The mind does not control the body. On the contrary...

Some people can't help but be depressed and need medication. Low levels of serotonin can affect brain activity and will ultimately influence your mind. You don't pick your urges and your emotions. If you did, you'd be able to choose to be happy--ecstatic, even--all the time. This is not possible. It is precisely the other way around: cells beget your state of mind. Physicalism as opposed to the existential absurdity you espoused.

There is no downward spiral. (This is an illusion.) People claim to improve themselves through meditation and yes, it is true that meditation is good for you--neuroscience surely reveals that it is beneficial to the brain--but do not make the mistake of thinking that you chose to take up meditation out of free will or that you manipulated the firing of neurons. For starters, there is no free will. There is will but it is not free. Influence is indeed the key here. Your environment, what happens to you, what you come across in life, how your organism reacts to such exposures determines what you will feel and ultimately think. Believe it or not, but scientific experiments, such as Libet's, demonstrate that decision-making happens in unconsciousness, meaning, the relevant brain activity starts before the subject becomes aware of making a decision.

One does not pick one's genome, family, upbringing, and the people one encounters in one's lifetime. Some people are depressed and have the urge to drink alcohol sinking further into depression. They succumbed to such urge because it is stronger than the urge to get better in their brains. The brain is so complex and haphazard in nature that it begets a mind in conflict. The individual has no hand in picking the winning urges and final thoughts... they just arise! Your urge to lucid dream, meditate, change diet and lifestyle (making you feel young) won out, it was stronger in your brain--and you were obviously exposed to beneficial "therapies" (saving you from a midlife crisis) that happened to resonate with you. I used to smoke. I quit eight years ago. Some people say I had "will power." But I contend that I was not really the author of the choice to quit. I just happened upon the right brain state. Why did I not succeed in quitting before the day when I finally succeeded? I couldn't because my brain wasn't ready. Matter is at the root of mental phenomenon. Where is free will in all of this? It is an illusion.

Oh, one more thing... Anyone who meditates will realise that the mind is noisy and many thoughts compete for the spotlight that is consciousness. These thoughts just arise. You do not pick them. Even when you think you are going against the tide of upward causation, and you try your might to focus on one particular thing, this decision had already arisen in the depths of the unconscious before you even became aware of it. Consciousness is not the author of anything, it is merely the witness. You don't even need a lab to observe this. When you touch a hot pan your hand quickly recoils in a reflex and there was no time to think. Afterwards you notice how it just happened. Consciousness is an illusion, too. When I say illusion, I am not saying that something doesn't exist. I am saying that it is not what it seems. Consciousness is like a centre of gravity--the Earth appears to have one--but, in this analogy, we must remember that there were no "centres of gravity" prior to planet formation. No magnetic points attracting dust in space. Particles of dust attracted one another. Consciousness is also analogous to the "wetness" of water. I can assure you that hydrogen and oxygen atoms, that make up the water molecule, are not wet!

Finally, consciousness is like a supermarket claiming authorship of fairtrade products imported from abroad. It brands these products harvested in unconscious land with its own logo. The self, or ego, the supposed "king" or "dictator" straight out of an Orwellian novel, selfishly takes the credit.

Some say no free will destroys the self-help industry. I disagree. Why would acknowledging free will as a mere illusion throw out the entire self-help industry? I'm not advocating fatalism here. From our perspective it seems that we are in control of many things and there is great utility in this. We have all made mistakes in the past, and at present we have the memory of those mistakes--something we couldn't possibly have before--which bestows us with an informed brain state urging us to avoid the same blunders. Hence, "I wish I had done this..." but at the time you couldn't because your physiology did not permit you to do so. Anyway, people should still be encouraged to better themselves. Improvement should still be sought because it is a viable option, a goal worth tackling. You might say, "If there is no free will, why bother to do anything at all? Why not just remain still and wait for things to happen?" But realise that even this would be a choice, and not just a defeatist one, but a hard one to make, too. (And remember: this choice would arise from physical mechanisms that you didn't author either.) You can decide what you decide but you cannot decide what you will decide. Hence no free will. Try to remain stationary forever and you will soon be faced with great challenges leading you to a tortured mental state. Tedium, hunger, thirst, and fatigue would soon blight you: your body urging you to move. The ego does not, naturally, like to acknowledge its enslaved state, so it pretends to be the author and deludes itself to be the master in control. I'll reiterate for emphasis: there is no such thing as free will. If you think about it, you will realise that the concept is absurd.

If you say what would be the point of embracing the idea you are inadvertently implying that there is no point in acknowledging certain truths. I don't know about you, but, I prefer cold-hearted truths to comfortable lies or delusions. Anyway, the idea isn't as bad as you might think. It means that we remind ourselves that anti-social disorders are not qualities that those afflicted with them pick for themselves. You don't pick the hand you are given. Yes, this does indeed destroy notions of culpability and praise when we observe that we do not author what drives us. Imagine a future utopia where our descendants look back at us and deem our judicial system to be barbaric with its punishment methodology. What sense does it make to penalise individuals who were given unfortunate hands in the game of life? Imagine a future where psychopathy is treatable like any other illness, or eradicable by genetic engineering! At the moment, criminal minds are incarcerated, and in a way it is the only efficient deterrent we have for their sake and the rest of society's. But we shouldn't forget that if we traded places with them, and thus possessed the same chemical make-up, we would behave exactly the same way. We would be them! Depressing is the idea that we vindictively punish the unfortunate instead of tackling the root-cause of their incompatibility with society. In a deterministic universe--a world of cause-and-effect--free will makes no sense.

Acknowledging that there is no free will should also help people to focus on the present moment and extinguish regret as they realise they couldn't have possibly behaved any other way in the past. ;-)

I am turning into nesgirl. :-D

[ Post made via Android ] Image



Seriously..... I have to ask.... if you believe half the shit you just posted.....why are you here? This site is for those who seek to expand the experience of lucid dreaming.....not your BS. Take it to another forum.

somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

Re: HELLO

Postby somfar » 19 Apr 2015 06:56

son of shennong wrote:Cool that you remember your childhood dreams.
I think it's important to remember that fear is an emotional state, in fact, just one of many. Behind all of our emotions is our awareness, which is more of a constant, altho the degree of our awareness naturally ebbs & flows over time in concert w our energy & mental power Dwelling more in awareness, letting your emotional states come and go, recognizing them for what they are but realizing you are more than just an emotional state, may help center you more to the point where LD's become easier for you. Do you meditate or do any sadhana? I find that actively working on building awareness complements dream experience awareness.



I don't meditate so much as I consider life a lesson to be lived and not just something to be considered. I try to live life in a very simple fashion, one that does require me to impress others with my intelligence. I am quite simply.. a simple man Logic isn't that hard. God has put the smartest of us all to shame.


THERE IS MORE IN LIFE THAT I DO NOT KNOW
THAN THERE IS THAT I DO.

somfar
Posts: 20
Joined: 12 Apr 2015 05:06

Re: HELLO

Postby somfar » 19 Apr 2015 07:04

somfar wrote:
son of shennong wrote:Cool that you remember your childhood dreams.
I think it's important to remember that fear is an emotional state, in fact, just one of many. Behind all of our emotions is our awareness, which is more of a constant, altho the degree of our awareness naturally ebbs & flows over time in concert w our energy & mental power Dwelling more in awareness, letting your emotional states come and go, recognizing them for what they are but realizing you are more than just an emotional state, may help center you more to the point where LD's become easier for you. Do you meditate or do any sadhana? I find that actively working on building awareness complements dream experience awareness.



I don't meditate so much as I consider life a lesson to be lived and not just something to be considered. I try to live life in a very simple fashion, one that does require me to impress others with my intelligence. I am quite simply.. a simple man Logic isn't that hard. God has put the smartest of us all to shame.


THERE IS MORE IN LIFE THAT I DO NOT KNOW
THAN THERE IS THAT I DO.



one that does NOT require me to impress others with my intelligence. ( sorry guess I need to check B4 I post ) that is what I meant to say.

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son of shennong
Posts: 44
Joined: 07 Apr 2015 16:44

Re: HELLO

Postby son of shennong » 19 Apr 2015 19:40

somfar wrote:I don't meditate so much as I consider life a lesson to be lived and not just something to be considered. I try to live life in a very simple fashion, one that does require me to impress others with my intelligence. I am quite simply.. a simple man Logic isn't that hard. God has put the smartest of us all to shame.


I readily agree w u about the importance of actually living life. Experience shapes & hopefully, evolves us into better individuals. However, I believe your statement concerning meditation, while true for anyone using it primarily as an escape from the travails of this world, is a bit misleading, done more as an ad hoc statement against your writing "life is a lesson to be lived."

I find meditation sharpens both my intellect & awareness of the world. It also improves the quality of my HI. Not an escape, more of adjunct or tool for living waking & dreaming life more fully. Furthermore, I posit you already meditate, perhaps daily too, only you neglect to put that label on it. I'll define meditation & then give one example of it. Meditation involves focused concentration on a single point (the point of reference is undefined. It can be anything for the meditator). 2nd - as you fall deeper into meditation over time, you are striving for a bit of a paradox, a state of relaxed/alertness. There's no end to it. It's like a bottomless ocean. U go as deep as ur abilities or schedule permit, then return to "the world" & strive there.

My example is listening to music. I presume u listen to music. There are people in this world who believe listening to music is blasphemy, but I doubt quite strongly you'll find any of them posting or lurking on this website.

Music is either heard or felt as an intellectual or emotional experience, or simultaneously heard & felt. Your favorite music. The song that is currently your favorite. When u really listen to it, your focus gravitates more & more towards it while @ the same time damping down on the world around u. U move towards what, in the case of athletics, he said, going out on a tangent to pluck a new word, is commonly called, "the zone". Heightened awareness. Relaxed & alert @ the same time. As a student of both Traditional Chinese & Western medicine, I find it fascinating that TCM states there is a direct connection between the ears & the Kidneys. Western medicine poopahs this, but when you consider emotionally responding to music & the fact that the adrenals rest upon the kidneys, well, there u go.

I like that u state u are a simple man in one sentence & in the next imply your enjoyment of logic & state it "isn't that hard." It tells me @ once you have a sense of humor & are more intelligent than u like to let on. Your statement about the Lord is true a priori.

I love it that you're in your 40's. Usus est magistus optimus - Practice is the best teacher.
“Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in."
Thoreau


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