Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

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deschainXIX
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Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby deschainXIX » 18 Aug 2015 03:04

FLOWER.JPG
This particular species is Passiflora caerulea (Wikipedia informs me that there are over five hundred different species, but luckily there are only nine in North America, so proper identification was not difficult). Spanish conquistadors in the 1400s, taken by the intricate and evidently spiritual anatomy of the flower and taking it as a sign of Providence's approval of their ventures, gave it its nomenclature after the "passion" of Jesus Christ. The various members of the flower's physiology have metaphorical meanings analogous to the crucifixion in Catholic mythos: the three stigmas of the flower represent the three nails used to attach the Son of God to the cross, and such forth.
FLOWER.JPG (77.04 KiB) Viewed 1941 times


I’ve been aware of the depressing qualities tea of Passion flower is wont to produce for quite some time. It’s a wonderful relaxant, utile for combating anxiety, stress, insomnia, and other maladies of the entangled and unstill mind. And though I had the plant growing all over my North American yard, I never bothered experimenting with it. Only recently, when pouring over Erowid experience vaults, did I note that some users have reported heightened dream vividity and/or recall. This was interesting, so I harvested several leaves from a plant in my yard, dried them, and boiled them in a tea.

LEAF.JPG
I don't have a dessicator, so I just placed the leaves under a heat lamp for a few days and they dried perfectly. Make sure that when you harvest from your plant you are cutting off the right part of the plant--it really is a beautiful and complicated and sprawling vine; bring your sharpest pocket knife.
LEAF.JPG (53.48 KiB) Viewed 1941 times


TEA.JPG
TEA.JPG (83.65 KiB) Viewed 1941 times


The tea was surprisingly pleasant. It had a floral, sweet taste and a fragrance not wholly incomparable to camomile. It’s nice just to drink it and enjoy the taste and feel of it. No discernible alterations to audition, taste, or other sensations, though I’ll make a note on vision in a moment. Drinking it was not a grueling affair, so I propose it as an alternative to Calea zacatechichi, a tea that I simply cannot make myself drink. The tea will turn a faint greenish color, though I added a bit of milk.

Before I bothered with tea, I went ahead and smoked one and a half bowls of dried Passion flower leaves. This left me feeling … different. Psychonauts will understand: after having consumed such a mild herb, sometimes there are no real alterations to perception, but you just sort of look at things differently. You’re more conscious of certain objects and visual phenomena that you wouldn’t have been if you weren’t on anything. You’re not hallucinating, you’re just taking note of the vast amount of reality that you ordinarily are not aware of. The night that I smoked it, I had a fairly considerable bout of insomnia (which could have been prompted by any number of variables, certainly not the leaf), but what REM sleep I did have was full of undoubtedly enhanced dreams.

Now, back to the tea. Drinking the tea was where I had the best results, probably because I was consuming more leaves this way. After I finished the whole pot of tea I got in bed and read a book for ten or fifteen minutes. I began to feel an irresistible weight on my eyelids and a heaviness over my whole body like a blanket of lead. I recognized this as the relaxation of skeletal muscle that the tea is supposed to instigate. I went to sleep and didn’t budge for the next six hours (except for getting up to use the bathroom once). It was not dissimilar to being shot with an animal tranquilizer. I descended into a deep sleep very quickly and remained there until my bladder made protest. I felt rejuvenated physically and psychologically the next day, just as one does after a good night’s sleep and a good night’s dreaming.

In keeping with psychonautical tradition, my “set” was as follows: I haven’t dream journaled in weeks. I haven’t been reality checking or attempting WILDs of any measure. I had a lucid dream three days ago, spontaneously. Earlier in the day, I worked out, so my body was more liable to be seduced by sleep. I hadn’t meditated that day, but I had the day before, so my mindfulness levels were not terribly low.

I went to bed at midnight and got up at 6AM (Wake Back to Bed is a method that should be exploited by everyone, even non-lucid dreamers)--I ate a scone, a banana, and a glass of milk, let my dog out, read a bit, then went back to bed and slept for six more hours.

Rarely (and perhaps never) have I experienced dreams of such potency, not even after having smoked Calea zacatechichi, and I rather immodestly consider myself an experienced lucid dreamer. There was intense detail and vividity and … logic. My dream recall was in a deplorable condition at the time, but even now, writing about it, I can summon the images from the dream with great clarity, as if they are happening now. The narrative of the dream was absurdly expansive. I can trace the thread of my dreams, how they coagulated and concatenated with Hitchcockian deception to the viewer, how the stories intermingled and ran into one another with all the fluidity of a well-edited film script. Perhaps I’m over-exaggerating, but I actually think I was learning from these dreams. I won’t go into the pedantic personal details, but I was being taught about the people in my lives and my perception of them, and my relationship with the world and its inhabitants. These dreams were different from normal ones.

I didn’t have a lucid dream that night, but I feel certain that if I had been going through the proper motions (meditation, journaling, reality checking, mindfulness exercises, various induction techniques) I would have had many, many lucid dreams. I’ll keep experimenting in the hopes of producing lucidity.

I am surprised beyond belief that this flower hasn’t been noted by the mainstream lucid dreaming community for its potential. I mean, I’m sure it has been, in several different places, but very few people actually use it for this purpose. Most people talk about C. zacatechichi. No doubt, everyone’s chemistry is manifestly different, so maybe it only has this effect on some people. Nevertheless, I recommend everyone try it to give their dream life (and their sleep life; it gets you asleep and keeps you asleep) a good kick.

A horticultural note: beware this recalcitrant weed if you intend to attempt cultivation. It will take over your yard if it is not kept at bay. Or at least the species indigenous to my yard will. It was strangulating the other plants whose growth I was attempting to encourage, so a few years ago I killed them off, despite their undeniably singular beauty. After I realized they possessed neurological effects propitious to the lucid dreamer, I searched across my yard and luckily the flower-vine was making an alarming recovery toward the back of the estate.

If you wish to cultivate it in your own yard, I recommend moderation and caution, unless you wish to produce and sell it commercially, in which case you’re in luck. The stuff will grow and grow and grow.

Next I’m going to try compounding the effects of Passion flower by smoking Calea zacatechichi. If you’ve experimented with Passion flower, tell us all about it. :D
Well said.

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Summerlander
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby Summerlander » 19 Aug 2015 00:30

What a great piece, Deschain! I'm loving the research and your attachments. I've said this before and I'll say it again: You are a prodigy; a beacon of hope; a great contributor to this site – don't you dare leave, mister!

I've been practising meditation lately and have been using ordinary or green tea to help me get into a favourable state. But I am not as great a phytologist as you, so, here are some questions...

Would you say tea of Passion flower is more effective in generating the zen 'magic'? Does Erowid report any other substances that help to invoke strong vivid dreams and durable lucid dreams – anything more powerful than Galantamine? How much of a role do you think the placebo effect played here – bearing in mind that Passifloraceae has been barely mentioned by the lucid dreaming community – and what does its chemistry tell us (any DMT-like compounds, perhaps)? (Sorry about the onslaught of questions, buddy!)

It sounds like it could be efficacious with the MILD method in particular! Thank you for your elaborate thesis and experiential reports – you are, officially, my psychonautical Darwin. 8-)

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- Padmasambhava

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deschainXIX
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby deschainXIX » 20 Aug 2015 00:21

Summerlander wrote:don't you dare leave, mister!


Leave and abandon such an interesting and erudite conversation companion? I’d never think of it (unless there was some other impetus, like HAGART saying I win too many debates). :D

Summerlander wrote:I've been practising meditation lately and have been using ordinary or green tea to help me get into a favourable state. But I am not as great a phytologist as you, so, here are some questions...


Great phytologist! Lol, don’t get that impression--my thumb is decidedly not green, despite my incessant attempts at making it so. I enjoy gardening and even mushroom cultivation, but what actually happens is I occasionally find myself wandering outside and tinkering with some pulsating green thing until it dies. Then I retreat back into the confines of books and theory. :D

In my subjective experience, green tea is better for meditation. In me it creates a calm, clear, focused state of mind that is relaxed yet sufficiently energized so as to remain awake even during the deeper stages of meditation. Passion flower makes me too tired for use in meditation, but I must admit I have never tried (aside from meditating before bed to get my body to relax). It could be useful to WILD, and I need to experiment more with it. I encourage you and everyone else to do the same! This is a quarter of oneironautics that is comparatively uncharted. We’re quasi-pioneers.

If anything, my experiences on Calea could possibly be attributed to placebo, because that is the plant from which I expected a great deal--yet I didn’t experience a great deal. In passiflora I only looked for an alternative to Calea that was more amiable to the taste (albeit less potent), because even smoking the bitter grass is harsh on the lungs and nasty-tasting unless I bother setting up a hookah. I was even duly skeptical of Passion flower and the alleged changes to dream vivacity others reported. The fact that I experienced more vivid dreams on Passion flower than on C. zacatechichi is significant in my mind. What is even more significant is that I did it at a time when my dream life was totally voided--I wasn’t remembering any dreams.

Well I did a little online research for you and apparently scientists don’t fully understand what goes on chemically in the mind with passiflora usage; they theorize that alkaloids and flavonoids manipulate the secretion of neurotransmitters associated with anxiety reduction. As far as DMT compounds, here’s an Erowid article you might find interesting:

https://www.erowid.org/plants/syrian_rue/syrian_rue_info1.shtml

I probably won’t use the plant again until I get my lucid dreaming “muscles” back into shape, a process that probably won’t take much longer than a week.
Well said.

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Summerlander
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby Summerlander » 20 Aug 2015 01:18

Leave and abandon such an interesting and erudite conversation companion? I’d never think of it (unless there was some other impetus, like HAGART saying I win too many debates).


Regarding debate victories, I think the mighty Hitch would have said to the pair of us: Not enough! :lol:

I enjoy gardening and even mushroom cultivation


Got any magic mushrooms? :mrgreen:

In my subjective experience, green tea is better for meditation. In me it creates a calm, clear, focused state of mind that is relaxed yet sufficiently energized so as to remain awake even during the deeper stages of meditation.


Same here. Green tea is my favourite, anyway.

I encourage you and everyone else to do the same! This is a quarter of oneironautics that is comparatively uncharted. We’re quasi-pioneers.


There will certainly be a first time. I'll get a hookah and lace it with Salvia Divinorum. :mrgreen:

As far as DMT compounds, here’s an Erowid article you might find interesting:

https://www.erowid.org/plants/syrian_rue/syrian_rue_info1.shtml


Damn it! Apparently my phone is not a compatible server. I'll have to check out the link on my PC when I get my hands on it.

I probably won’t use the plant again until I get my lucid dreaming “muscles” back into shape, a process that probably won’t take much longer than a week.


After my holiday in Weymouth, I've been slacking. I need to have more WILDs and continue to work on my book about lucid dreaming and other psychonautical explorations. 8-)

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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deschainXIX
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby deschainXIX » 20 Aug 2015 02:06

Summerlander wrote:Got any magic mushrooms?


I've grown gourmet delicacy mushrooms in the past and sold them to my local Farmer's Market. But I actually am ordering a Psilocybe cubensis spore syringe. (I discarded the one I found while hiking, in case you were wondering--didn't want to take the risk with improper dosage, mistaken identification, et cetera.)

Summerlander wrote:Same here. Green tea is my favourite, anyway.


It's great. Largely considered the healthiest thing you can drink, physically as well as psychologically.

Summerlander wrote:There will certainly be a first time. I'll get a hookah and lace it with Salvia Divinorum.


Salvia has a bad reputation, I hear. Doesn't it give you bad trips all the time?

Summerlander wrote:After my holiday in Weymouth, I've been slacking. I need to have more WILDs and continue to work on my book about lucid dreaming and other psychonautical explorations.


Keep at it! Not nearly enough good literature on lucid dreaming out there. There's real potential to make money off it, I feel.

(By the way, I'll get around to replying on 'The Shocking Truth.' Don't think I've abandoned you. I think I've just dragged us into the weeds a bit too much. Going about making a response is difficult.)
Well said.

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Summerlander
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby Summerlander » 21 Aug 2015 02:27

I've grown gourmet delicacy mushrooms in the past and sold them to my local Farmer's Market. But I actually am ordering a Psilocybe cubensis spore syringe. (I discarded the one I found while hiking, in case you were wondering--didn't want to take the risk with improper dosage, mistaken identification, et cetera.)


A wise decision. You can never be too careful.

Salvia has a bad reputation, I hear. Doesn't it give you bad trips all the time?


I only took Salvia once. It all depends on how you define your comfort zone. After a powerful inhalation of the sage, the entire world was taken away for a few seconds; everything I knew seemed like a distant memory; and, yes, a slight queasiness accompanied the experience. Swimming, confused, in a soup of giant molecules will either amaze or terrify you.

When I 'came to' (after the strange 'helterskelter') I thought I was on the edge of a cliff with a warm draught blowing in my face – as though I were on a rollercoaster ride – only to realise immediately afterwards that I was leaning over the coffee table! This was followed by a couple of hours of great arousal and heightened perception – where colours were well defined yet somewhat soiled – and that night I had flashbacks in my dreams; in one particular dream, I was on a moving train when the 'helterskelter' feeling took me by surprise and made me lose balance! Still, I liked it because it was different from my default perception. 8-)

Keep at it! Not nearly enough good literature on lucid dreaming out there. There's real potential to make money off it, I feel.


Thanks, buddy! That's encouraging. :-)

(By the way, I'll get around to replying on 'The Shocking Truth.' Don't think I've abandoned you. I think I've just dragged us into the weeds a bit too much. Going about making a response is difficult.)


If you do reply on that topic, take your time, no worries! Our topics may only be a few pages long but they always outshine Megaman. ;-)

By the way, how would you go about identifying Psilocybe Cubensis? Can you describe the process? (For some reason I'm picturing you wearing a lab coat and performing a litmus test.) :lol:

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"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

Enra Traz
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby Enra Traz » 04 Nov 2015 00:41

Any more experiments with Passifloraceae, Des? 8-)

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Summerlander
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby Summerlander » 25 Dec 2015 21:15

Any further conclusions?

[ Post made via Android ] Image
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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lucidity4life
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Re: Psychonautical Efficacy of Passifloraceae

Postby lucidity4life » 19 Apr 2016 03:45

ayahuasca vine also it has more harmaline alkaloids etc
botanicalguides.com - live love dream - Botanical Guides is a comprehensive guide to oneirogens and other ethnobotanicals a-z.


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