Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened?

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koloryczerni
Posts: 12
Joined: 23 Oct 2015 17:50

Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened?

Postby koloryczerni » 02 Jan 2016 13:53

I have had lucid dreams before, not super long and not very often but usually once per 2 weeks and now it seems like nothing I do works.
I do several reality checks during the day: looking at my hands, remembering how I got to the place where I am and what I did earlier in the day, looking for abnormal things and dream signs in my surroundings.
I can remember from 1 to 5 dreams each night and I still sleep enough to actually dream.
Any help? :(

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Prince Demitri
Posts: 167
Joined: 30 Dec 2015 11:47
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby Prince Demitri » 02 Jan 2016 14:15

Hi there!

It seems like you're doing all the useful stuff you should be doing to help maximize your chances.

However, since it doesn't seem to be working well for you even while doing those things, I have a few questions that might help me give you some useful ideas.

Only answer the ones you feel comfortable answering, but please try to be as specific with your answers as you can, okay?

:?: Do you meditate regularly? If so, what type of meditation do you practice? Can you describe what you do while you meditate?

:?: Do you mix-up your reality checks, or stick to a specific pattern when you do them? Can you describe any patterns you recognize after thinking about it a moment?

:?: When you are doing a reality check, which outcome are you expecting more often: To be awake, or to be dreaming?

I look forward to helping you out with some actionable advice.
Cheers! 8-)
Oneironaut experience: ~28 years
Average LDs per month: Usually 16 to 30 (depending on whether or not I want to)

I enjoy helping others and answering questions. 8-)

koloryczerni
Posts: 12
Joined: 23 Oct 2015 17:50

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby koloryczerni » 03 Jan 2016 18:06

Hi Prince,
Thanks for your reply.
These are the answers:
Do you meditate regularly? If so, what type of meditation do you practice? Can you describe what you do while you meditate?
I don't meditate at all as I don't find it useful for anything

Do you mix-up your reality checks, or stick to a specific pattern when you do them? Can you describe any patterns you recognize after thinking about it a moment?
I use the same reality checks every time. But I don't know what else I can do. Especially since I usually dream about things that I never ever see in the real life so it's hard for me to for example, do a reality check when I see something that is repeating in my dreams. What are other things I could be doing?

When you are doing a reality check, which outcome are you expecting more often: To be awake, or to be dreaming?
To be awake - what does that mean?

Thanks a lot! :)

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Prince Demitri
Posts: 167
Joined: 30 Dec 2015 11:47
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby Prince Demitri » 03 Jan 2016 23:33

Hi there!

Thank you for the answers, they are a great help. Let's step thru these one at a time:

koloryczerni wrote:I don't meditate at all as I don't find it useful for anything

When done correctly, meditation is the easiest way to give a boost to every aspect of your life (including work, school, family issues, health, lucid dreaming, etc). If done wrong, its just sitting around doing nothing for a while.

There's a ton of books/classes/gurus/videos/etc out there about meditation. Unfortunately, many of them are more about making money than they are about helping people "do it correctly", and many of the ones that aren't trying to make money are following the example of those who are.

Productive meditation generally takes between 5 and 20 minutes of your day. Meditating longer than that is not necessary or especially helpful. Many people think you should try to clear your mind when you meditate - this is fine if all you want to do is spend some time sitting around being quiet and relaxing, but overall it isn't especially helpful for being productive or lucid dreaming.

This meditation is best done in the morning after you have woken up and recorded your dream in your dream journal and either before or after you have used the bathroom (depending on the urgency you feel toward the bathroom), but can be done anytime during your day. The steps to a productive meditation session are as follows:

:arrow: Prepare: Relax in a comfortable position (not laying down) and close your eyes. Breathe in thru your nose slowly until your lungs are full. Hold that breath for a few seconds and then let it out slowly thru your mouth. Repeat this 3 to 6 times while letting go of anything else you might be thinking about in your life for the moment (you can return to those things in a few minutes when you're done).

:arrow: Focus on yourself: Visualize yourself releasing stress with each exhale and taking in fresh, revitalizing air as you inhale. As you do this, think about at least 3 different things you love about yourself, and spend a few moments thinking about each of these things one at a time to build up a strong feeling of self appreciation.

:arrow: Focus on compassion: Visualize the compassion you have built up for yourself as tho it were a bubble around you, and extend that bubble outwards to encompass the entire room you're in and anyone else in it. Imagine at least 2 things you love and appreciate about anyone that might be within your extended bubble now.

:arrow: Expand further: Continue expanding your bubble and the compassion you feel for those with it step-by-step to encompass your entire house, then your block, then your city, then your state, then your country, then your hemisphere, then the entire world. Visualize it and allow yourself to find at least 1 thing to appreciate and have compassion about everyone and everything.

:arrow: Forgive: Think about someone that you feel has wronged you in some way recently, and imagine they are standing before you. Then in your mind, tell them you forgive them, and hope they will also forgive you any injustices you may have done against them.

:arrow: Accept: Next, imagine that every creature and person on the planet is responding to the compassion you felt for them by sending their own acceptance, appreciation, and compassion to you. Allow yourself to accept these positive intentions from everyone toward you.

:arrow: Envision: Now imagine the day ahead of you as you would like for it to be. If you were to be the movie director for your perfect day, how would you want it to be? That's how you should visualize it now. Take your time with this section, as it should be the longest part of your session. Be as detailed as you can be, and try to feel it as fully as you can.

:arrow: Gratitude: Thank yourself for being so accepting and loving toward yourself, and for envisioning an amazing day that you can look forward to. Do your best to feel thankful as if you have been given a gift of seeing how wonderful your day can be.

:arrow: End the session: Take a few deep breaths as you allow your awareness to spread to where your body is and your immediate surroundings. With each breath allow yourself to feel more awake and aware, until you are ready to open your eyes and get on with living the day you envisioned.

This meditation usually takes a beginner about 15 to 20 minutes to do, but can be done in as little as 5 minutes once you have practiced it for a while. I also suggest a bedtime meditation which is shorter still, and helps to relax, priming you for a good night of rest. Here are the steps for that:

:arrow: Prepare: Relax in a comfortable sitting position in your bed and close your eyes. Breathe in thru your nose slowly until your lungs are full. Hold that breath for a few seconds and then let it out slowly thru your mouth. Repeat this 3 to 6 times while letting go of any of the stresses you feel from your day with each exhale.

:arrow: Review the good: Think about at least 3 good things you enjoyed about the day, and what about them you enjoyed most. Allow yourself to relive and feel how those moments made you feel.

:arrow: Review your concerns: Think about your 2 biggest concerns about the coming day, and imagine you are placing those concerns into a small box with a hinged lid. The things in this imaginary box are the things you want your subconscious to help you work on while you sleep. Then set that aside so you don't have to concern yourself with it for now.

:arrow: Select your target: Select 1 thing/place/event/person/etc you would like to dream about, and do your best to visualize it in as much detail as you can. Allow yourself to feel what you might feel if that was your dream, and how you might like to experience it.

:arrow: Lay down: Open your eyes only as much as you need to and gently lay down in your bed and get comfortable.

:arrow: Drift prompt: As you continue thinking about your dream target, allow your control over it to relax and just enjoy however your mind expands on what you are imagining. Do this as you allow yourself to drift off to sleep.

That's all there is to a productive meditation practice. I have thought about making an MP3 for a guided meditation of this practice, but I haven't yet done so. There are some other guided meditations that are similar to this, but most of them add in extra stuff which I haven't found to be especially beneficial for anything, and can even become distracting, making it more difficult to achieve your goals.

I use the same reality checks every time. But I don't know what else I can do.

This could be a significant part of what's been obstructing you. I try my best to make each RC (reality check) as unique as I can, that way they don't become automatic. Otherwise, you could be doing them in your sleep and never even know it.

I commented about how to mix things up when it comes to RCs in this thread: http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=17334

Especially since I usually dream about things that I never ever see in the real life so it's hard for me to for example, do a reality check when I see something that is repeating in my dreams. What are other things I could be doing?

It sounds like you may be able to identify some dream signs if you see some things repeatedly in your dreams that you don't see in waking life. You may want to read some of the articles here on dream signs. :)

As for some other types of RCs, have a look at the thread I gave above, and give those a try. There are also other suggestions for RCs if those don't work out for you either after a while.

When you are doing a reality check, which outcome are you expecting more often: To be awake, or to be dreaming?

To be awake - what does that mean?

When you do a reality check, you should be doing your best to expect to find that you are dreaming, and allow yourself to feel a twinge of disappointment if you discover that you are actually awake. The reason for this is because then it's more likely that you'll perform an RC while in a dream, and then your expectation to be dreaming will snap you into lucidity when you don't get that feeling of slight disappointment.

Thanks a lot! :)

I hope this helps. Give these things a try for a week or so and let me know how it's going, or if you have any problems, okay?

Chat at cha again soon!
Cheers! 8-)
Oneironaut experience: ~28 years
Average LDs per month: Usually 16 to 30 (depending on whether or not I want to)

I enjoy helping others and answering questions. 8-)

koloryczerni
Posts: 12
Joined: 23 Oct 2015 17:50

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby koloryczerni » 05 Jan 2016 23:55

Wow thank you for such a detailed reply! I will update in a couple of weeks, I hope it improve by the end of February.

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Prince Demitri
Posts: 167
Joined: 30 Dec 2015 11:47
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby Prince Demitri » 06 Jan 2016 00:36

You're very welcome.

I look forward to hearing how this does (or even doesn't) help you out. :D

Cheers! 8-)
Oneironaut experience: ~28 years
Average LDs per month: Usually 16 to 30 (depending on whether or not I want to)

I enjoy helping others and answering questions. 8-)

koloryczerni
Posts: 12
Joined: 23 Oct 2015 17:50

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby koloryczerni » 09 Jan 2016 22:57

Hi Prince,
Just wanted to ask a quick question - do you have more trouble lucid dreaming when you're in a stressful time in your life? I've been having a lot of stress for the past month or so and that's when I noticed that I stopped lucid dreaming..

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Prince Demitri
Posts: 167
Joined: 30 Dec 2015 11:47
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby Prince Demitri » 10 Jan 2016 01:27

Hey Koloryczerni!

Stress certainly effects my dreams.
I've had mixed experiences when it comes to stress tho.
Sometimes stress hinders my dream recall and lucidity, and sometimes it heightens them.

It's a mixed bag for me.
Kinda like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates, "Ya never know whatcha gonna get."

;)
Oneironaut experience: ~28 years
Average LDs per month: Usually 16 to 30 (depending on whether or not I want to)

I enjoy helping others and answering questions. 8-)

koloryczerni
Posts: 12
Joined: 23 Oct 2015 17:50

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby koloryczerni » 10 Jan 2016 14:36

Another question... when you wake up in the middle of the night and remember the dream, do you still record it? Cause I usually do but then it kind of wakes me up and it's really hard to go back to sleep :P Unfortunately I wake up multiple times during the night, I wish I could sleep all night straight

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Prince Demitri
Posts: 167
Joined: 30 Dec 2015 11:47
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA

Re: Haven't had a lucid dream in over a month. What happened

Postby Prince Demitri » 10 Jan 2016 19:00

koloryczerni wrote:Another question... when you wake up in the middle of the night and remember the dream, do you still record it? Cause I usually do but then it kind of wakes me up and it's really hard to go back to sleep :P Unfortunately I wake up multiple times during the night, I wish I could sleep all night straight

Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't.

Recording dreams in a dream journal is more important for newer oneironauts, and is helpful for more experienced oneironauts if their dream recall seems to be fading. I'll be posting about this topic in the Consolidated Lucidity Advice thread I started (in the General Lucid Discussion section) soon.

As a quick summary tho, dream journals have three main purposes.
:arrow: To train your subconscious to help you remember your dreams (dream recall).
:arrow: To search for patterns in your dreams (to find dream signs and any meanings there may be).
:arrow: As a nostalgia keepsake, so you can review them much later and find astonishing new patterns over the long term (which could have more subtle overall meanings for your life, or just be cool to remember).

You don't have to get up in the middle of the night to ensure you've recorded all your dreams unless you're having a difficult time with dream recall. Even if you forget a couple of your dreams over the night, but remember the most recent one when you wake up, just jot down what you do remember. It'll serve the same purpose.

If the middle-of-the-night dream was one that you want to record, then by all means, make the effort to at least get some keywords recorded (written down, or by voice recorder, etc) to help jog your memory after you wake up for your day.

I love these questions! :D
Cheers! 8-)
Oneironaut experience: ~28 years
Average LDs per month: Usually 16 to 30 (depending on whether or not I want to)

I enjoy helping others and answering questions. 8-)


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