Dreaming of a lucid dream?

A place to share and analyze your dreams (lucid or otherwise) to better understand your dreams' subconscious symbolism.
GabeCMC
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Joined: 18 Apr 2016 23:01

Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby GabeCMC » 19 Apr 2016 05:31

I had a dream where I recognized that I was dreaming, I remember breathing through my nose when it was plugged as my indicator. I don't really remember having any real control over what was happening, I was sort of just along for the ride. I'm wondering though, if it was really a lucid dream. I woke up and I remembered it like any other dream. I didn't remember it like something I did earlier that day it was more like remembering something that I did as a child, a distant memory, like any other dream I've remembered. When I woke up and remembered what happened, it just didn't feel real, if you know what I mean, it wasn't very vivid. If what I am explaining is what its supposed to feel like after having a lucid dream, whats the point? Was this a lucid dream, was I just dreaming that I had a lucid dream, or was it just a dream?

yosa2
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Joined: 21 Apr 2016 00:27

Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby yosa2 » 21 Apr 2016 00:39

You were most likely waking up from a dream, at that stage of activity you can often be cognitive, especialy if there is a sharp memory,

ThePurple
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Joined: 02 Nov 2015 01:30

Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby ThePurple » 21 Apr 2016 05:53

There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding about what a lucid dream is, stemming from the fact that "lucid" is synonymous with "clarity" in other contexts. As I understand it, the single defining trait of a lucid dream is knowing it's a dream while it's happening. So, yes, you had a lucid dream. (Though you likely lost lucidity soon after, as the fact is easily forgotten when going along for the ride, unless special effort is made to remind yourself throughout.)

Lucid vs non-lucid is the only real on-off switch involved here. (And even that is debatable.) Every other characteristic of a dream—clarity of the dream world, control over its elements, vividness of memory—comes in varying amounts, irrespective of others' levels. Though they are sometimes spontaneously enhanced by becoming aware of the dream state, it is by no means guaranteed. However, you can do many many things to build these up separately. Fulfilling lucid dreams involve a set of skills, not a single ability. (Quickie answers: for clarity, observe; for control, believe; for memory, write.)

As for "what's the point?" ...it may help to investigate why you became interested in lucid dreaming in the first place.

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Summerlander
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Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby Summerlander » 21 Apr 2016 12:28

ThePurple's definition of a lucid dream is quite precise and I'm surprised that people are still confused about what the experience entails.

Alan Worsley pointed out that it is possible to have 'bizarre' thoughts during a lucid dream. For example, last night I had an amazing lucid dream where I flew over the most beautiful landscape and kept aiming to go higher and higher--using an impossibly tall tree as a point of reference--in order to see more beyond the horizon. The characters that had been present prior to my lucidity had disappeared; later, however, when I landed on top of what looked like the Great Wall of China and still knowing that I was dreaming, someone below informed me that the giant ogre (monster from a previous non-lucid dream) was coming back. I heard the monster approaching (like King Kong coming from a distance) and a guttural growl. Me and my informant decided to hide inside a tree trunk. I reasoned that because it was a dream I could just pass through the bark like a ghost instead of squeezing through a crevice like my dream companion--and yet, I was afraid of the 'ogre' like it was something real and capable of harming me ...

We can either interpret this to mean that my lucidity was dwindling or that I was dreaming of having a lucid dream at that point. My reasoning, however, was undeniably impaired. Here is the pertinent link where Worsely illustrates what I'm talking about:

http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13266

I would like to point out that my lucid dream was quite vivid--unlike GabeCMC's--and recalled like something real which took place this morning. I think to reach this level of impact one needs to practise dream recall and apply sensory amplification techniques whilst lucid dreaming. Lucid dreams--like ordinary ones--can either be vague or vivid. Some have mnemonic impact whilst others are simply forgotten. The same thing can be said for waking life events. The key to rendering any experience significantly realistic is to mindfully embrace them. 8-)
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

GabeCMC
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Joined: 18 Apr 2016 23:01

Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby GabeCMC » 21 Apr 2016 23:36

ThePurple wrote:There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding about what a lucid dream is, stemming from the fact that "lucid" is synonymous with "clarity" in other contexts. As I understand it, the single defining trait of a lucid dream is knowing it's a dream while it's happening. So, yes, you had a lucid dream. (Though you likely lost lucidity soon after, as the fact is easily forgotten when going along for the ride, unless special effort is made to remind yourself throughout.)

Lucid vs non-lucid is the only real on-off switch involved here. (And even that is debatable.) Every other characteristic of a dream—clarity of the dream world, control over its elements, vividness of memory—comes in varying amounts, irrespective of others' levels. Though they are sometimes spontaneously enhanced by becoming aware of the dream state, it is by no means guaranteed. However, you can do many many things to build these up separately. Fulfilling lucid dreams involve a set of skills, not a single ability. (Quickie answers: for clarity, observe; for control, believe; for memory, write.)

As for "what's the point?" ...it may help to investigate why you became interested in lucid dreaming in the first place.


When I said "what's the point?" I was wondering if lucid dream memories are usually very vivid. I said "what's the point?" because even if you can do whatever you want in a dream, if you don't have a vivid memory of it, it would seem like just another dream. I remember that I recognized I was dreaming and throughout the dream I reminded myself by breathing through my nose while it was plugged but I remember it so faintly. My question to you is, do you usually get a very vivid memory of a lucid dream or is it usually a very faint memory?

Edit: Thanks Summerlander! I think your response answered my question pretty well.

ThePurple
Posts: 153
Joined: 02 Nov 2015 01:30

Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby ThePurple » 22 Apr 2016 21:53

GabeCMC wrote: My question to you is, do you usually get a very vivid memory of a lucid dream or is it usually a very faint memory?


It depends.

I attribute the vividness of memory to two factors: dedication to certain skill-building practices, and the meaningfulness of the dream itself.

I have seen a dramatic increase in the amount of detail I can remember, and how readily it comes back, with the introduction of dream journaling. This act of reflecting on the experience several times—first while lying quietly in bed, then jotting keywords, then describing in detail—solidifies that memory by reinforcing the network of thoughts such that recalling part will flood back the whole. Its effect is cumulative, too; when I get lazy and skip journaling for a few days, my immediate recollection (as well as general awareness and likelihood of lucidity) plummets.

But, that's afterwards. Making an effort to be in the moment as fully as possible while you are experiencing it also goes a very long way. As Summerlander said, "The key to rendering any experience significantly realistic is to mindfully embrace them." Meditate and practice awareness while you're awake. Investigate, enhance, and absorb the details of the dream world while you're asleep. Engage completely.

Then there's the content. Those experiences we find most meaningful, beautiful, or exciting will be the ones that stick with us. I can recall a dream of discovery and fascination from many months ago much more clearly than I remember most of the events of yesterday. This is true of regular dreams and waking life as well, but the benefit of lucid dreaming is that you can make it meaningful, beautiful, or exciting. So in that sense, the memories have a higher likelihood of being vivid when you were lucid.

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HAGART
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Re: Dreaming of a lucid dream?

Postby HAGART » 27 Apr 2016 02:11

I sometimes dream with 'lucid powers' like telekinesis and don't realize it's a dream, and other times, I'm lucid, but only remember a few scraps later in the day because it was sandwiched between two non-lucid dreams which make it hard to remember.

There's a huge variety of lucid dreams depending on two main factors:
Vividness and Lucidity.

They are two separate aspects of dreams. I've had some amazingly vivid dreams without being lucid, and also a few lucid dreams that were in dark, vague places.

So what constitutes a lucid dream?

It's simply, when you are thinking rationally, and are self aware, just as you are in waking life, but in a dream, even if for a moment.
If we all lucid dreamed this world would be a better place.


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