Books about anarchism?

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Knife
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Books about anarchism?

Postby Knife » 10 Jun 2016 21:05

So I hit the library last week and tried to find a book about anarchism but there is none there. I did find a book about an anarchist movement in Belgium in the 1çth century and some about anarchist minded people but that's not quite what I'm looking for. while the libtary ain't the biggest one out there, I left slightly dissapointed with books about less interesting topics.

Now I was thinking to go to a bigger library in the big city after I return these and try there. Anyone knows a famous book (famous enough to be in a Belgian library) about anarchism as philosophy or political view (not too political, that's boring)?

I don't own an Ibook or whatever they call it, so that's not an option. Physical copies>virtual reading

I asked here because I know there are some critical, intelligent bookworms on here :ugeek: :mrgreen:
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Summerlander
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Summerlander » 11 Jun 2016 00:50

The topic of anarchism is certainly interesting but I haven't looked into it other than reading about the political theories of Thomas Hobbes---who supported monarchy---and the ones who opposed his views and tended to be anarchistic. Perhaps you will find something for the layman in Bertrand Russell's literature, something which is not too political for your liking but more along the lines of sociology and psychology.
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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deschainXIX
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby deschainXIX » 12 Jun 2016 03:23

I believe Noam Chomsky wrote a book on it. It's named, believe it or not, "On Anarchism." I'd start there.
Well said.

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Knife
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Knife » 12 Jun 2016 11:48

Thanks! I'll try to find it!
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Summerlander
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Summerlander » 12 Jun 2016 12:02

deschainXIX wrote:I believe Noam Chomsky wrote a book on it. It's named, believe it or not, "On Anarchism." I'd start there.


I just found it in a charity shop! :-D
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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Knife
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Knife » 12 Jun 2016 15:46

Sent me :lol:
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Summerlander
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Summerlander » 13 Jun 2016 00:43

Lol! No chance! :mrgreen:
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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Knife
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Knife » 13 Jun 2016 19:19

Next time I go to the thrift store I'll check out the book section too. I usually just stick to the vinyl and cd's :mrgreen:
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Summerlander
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Summerlander » 13 Jun 2016 20:30

You could always get Letters to a Young Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens. It's not about anarchism but it will open your mind to your potential to think for yourself and go against majorities if necessary. (It could very well inspire you to be anarchistic, though.) It is a gem of a book!

He explains how he never expected any leniency from his critics (he, too, had attacked people) and how opposition to what he stood for only inured him. 'Contrarian', in the sense of opposing mob mentality, is justified!

I have heard the Hitch say he didn't like to be referred to as a contrarian as the whim that truth and reason are not priorities is predicated on such label alongside the formula that nonconformity is dogmatically cardinal. But the word 'contrarian,' within that Hitchensian context, is apropos and literarily applied.

It has taught me to see that sometimes the avowal that neither side of an argument has a complete picture of the truth is applicable. And, realistically speaking, sometimes it is true to say that one side has it totally wrong. Within the public debate situation, even Christopher Hitchens would be pressed to admit that concessionary statements will not earn you points and this, however noble, may lead to your rival's victory (even if this one happens to hold a mistaken view), because, after all, public debates are about winning and losing. (As opposed to a normal discourse where both parties are unprepared, and, if they are both fair, share the common interest of getting to the bottom of things.)

When renowned intellectuals agree to take part in a debate, they must make sure that they have done their homework and stand firmly on their convictions. From their individual perspectives both have arrived at the final conclusion. Their arguments must be incontestable insofar as each party can tell.

A public debate centres on a controversial topic and your argument needs to be wisely built and stand in such a way that no bridge between it and opposing towers is possible. There is no room for compromise. But you better be on the side of truth so that your case is bulletproof and necessitates no additions. In the debate arena, opposing participants are there principally to assert and contradict---not to appease rivals and respect their views.

The public debate is like a courtroom. When you're about to take the podium, you should be in a position where the time to be humble is over. The thorough research on the topic in question should have been done and all that remains is for you to present your case and face possible criticism. You should have thought of all possible questions and doubts; pseudo-arguments; possible counterarguments; strawmen; ad hominem disceptations; and your casuistry radar should exhibit the strongest acuity.

Bridges can only be built in normal discussions where all parties play fair and it's not about victories. :geek:
"Empty cognizance of one taste, suffused with knowing, is your unmistaken nature, the uncontrived original state. when not altering what is, allow it to be as it is, and the awakened state is right now spontaneously present."

- Padmasambhava

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Knife
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Re: Books about anarchism?

Postby Knife » 13 Jun 2016 21:18

Thanks for the recommandation, although I'm already a really "against the grain" type of dude. I'll try to find it for sure!

Weird how school always taught me debates are not about winning haha.

Usually the truth in a debate/conversation lies within personal principles, standards and experiences though.
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